Hera's Story

Margali

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Hera and I had a lovely visit. We walked border of the front acreage accessible to sheep. The middle is still a flooded mess. Then we sat out by sheep pen for awhile.
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Ridgetop

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I would be careful introducing her to the house dogs. Other than Bruno what kind do you have, what sex and how old. Biscuit? All this is important to know when introducing new dogs.

Keep both Hera and Bruno on leashes. Take her into his territory to introduce them, don't let him into her pen. This gives him the edge since she is entering his territory. Let them sniff and get acquainted but keep them on lead at all times and be prepared to yank them apart at the first intimation of aggression. Petting both dogs at the same time by different members of the family is good. Then switch off who is holding the leads and make sure that all family members pet both dogs in each other's company. You want Hera to see that you are friendly to Bruno and that he is not a threat to the family or sheep. Do the same with the next dog. Do this one as a time. Don't overwhelm her with too many dogs since that can cause her to feel threatened and initiate a need to protect.

Most Anatolians won't kill tiny or toy size dogs. Not sure they even realize that they are dogs. She probably won't attack Bruno once they are introduced since he is a male. Female and male Anatolians usually get along with members of the oposite sex. Usually, but there is the rare occurrence where they just hate each other. As long as Bruno is not allowed in the sheep area alone, she will recognize that he can come and go on other parts of the property without problems. If you have a young puppy, the puppy will be safe until it grows large and old enough to challenge her. The main problem with Anatolians is that they will be aggressive with strange dogs which is a good thing. Once she realizes that your other dogs are supposed to be on the property, they will be safe (tolerated). UNTIL AND UNLESS they challenge her superiority, she will not bother them. If she thinks they are challenging her, she will attack them and beat them into submission. Once they submit, she will probably stop the attack and wait to see they do. If they show submission on their bellies usually, she will back away. In rare instances she might kill them if they do not submit to her authority by showing submission.

What commands has she been taught by her previous owners. Has she been taught to back away when commanded? Leave it? anything that might be usable in a situation where she might attack your current dogs? Do not shout if she attacks or seems to be preparing to attack. Instead calm her with baby talk and let her know that the situation is not dangerous. Shouting at an Anatolian usually makes them think that you are egging them on, or are in danger and they increase their aggression.

You will find many unusual and wonderful things about Anatolians and the way they interact with you, the sheep, predators, etc. They will play with small children, protect babies and toddlers, but normally don't obey their commands since they do not see children as being high enough in the pack hierarchy. Older children are not recognized as infants to be protected and it is possible that teen and Jr Hi age friends will be seen as adult strangers. Also be aware that once she integrated into your family, she will not necessarily accept friends who come over unless she is introduced and sees them often.

Have the loaded gun talk with your children. Anatolians can be like a loaded gun, you need to know how to be careful with friends and strangers around them so the gun doesn't go off.
 

Margali

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@Ridgetop Bruno is a fixed ~2yr old male Rottie-heeler mix that weighs ~70lbs. Biscuit is a fixed ~3mo old Aussie cattle dog mix that weighs ~20lbs. Not super happy shelter fixed him at 3 months but it's a done deal. I will do a leash introduction as you suggest.

The only verbal commands she knows are her name and "Here!". She has good crate and leash manners. She understands a kissy noise and gentle tug on leash means please start walking again. I am going to work on basic commands as we learn each other. The Howells were very hands off, old school.

We've already had the talk that she is sad and scarred because she had to leave her home. That her leg hurts her and not to touch. Children are not allowed into sheep area without adult. I will be reinforcing it as we go.
 
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Margali

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So Hera is out with the sheep. I supervised for about an hour. She stared at them and proceeded to patrol laps around the shed area. Pee in multiple spots, I assume to overwrite Bruno's marks. She got close enough to spook Oreo who is only adult that hasn't been with a LGD. Hera stood still, then angled farther away as she continued her patrolling. She then flopped in sunny patch within sight of the sheep.

We had an unintentional fence meeting with Bruno thanks to the 5yr old letting him out. She stood there calmly as Bruno did multiple play bows, crouched down wriggling, and peed on his side of the fence. She looked at him "Nah, not playing with idiots" and walked over to cattle panel gate. There he offered play bows again and she deigned to sniff noses before finding her sunny spot. I calmly said good bye to Hera and escorted Bruno and Dominic back into house. Of course the sick 5yr old decided to come outside in mud boots and swim trunks, no shirt. That is NOT what he was wearing an hour ago when I went outside.

The hilarious part is I was talking to @Baymule on the phone while this was going on asking food advice. She got a play-by-play account. I had to suppress the happy squeeing so I didn't upset anyone.
 

Margali

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Yep, dignified reserve is a good description of her attitude towards everything so far. We had a slightly more controlled fence line greeting with Biscuit puppy on a leash. Again, no issues.
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Right now she is chilling near sheep with Cassandra and I.
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Margali

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Dinner feeding routine went well aided by the drizzling rain. All the sheep and Hera were in the shed. Hera went thru door to outside area then waited to approach until I set bowl down and backed away. I fed all the sheep then hung out for a few minutes before picking up bowl and coming in out of rain. I made 2 cups of Diamond Natural Adult Large Dog with a hot dog and 1/2 can of Friskies meaty bits. She left about half cup of plain kibble which I took in.

When I can, I will raise the top of the door about 6 inches, she's having to crouch and scrape her back a bit. I didn't ask her to sit for food since she's not used to it and getting up/down is painful. I'm also going to turn the inside door into a dutch door so the sheep will not get her bowl if I feed inside.
 
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