Sheepshape

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The mulch is pretty deep in most of the area. it will require being pulled back to expose the soil so seed can make contact
Just a thought....that top layer looks pretty dry. Would hosing it down help? As we have such a wet climate, that straw would rapidly become soaked and would rot down fast over here (may go mouldy, though).
 

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A vid on swales....I too have questioned the efficacy of swales and hugelkulture styles of trying to grow things.

 

Baymule

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Videos are hard for me to watch. They stop, circle, start, stop, circle FOREVER, start and by that time I want to throw my laptop against the wall. Plus they eat up my plan time.

Just a thought....that top layer looks pretty dry. Would hosing it down help? As we have such a wet climate, that straw would rapidly become soaked and would rot down fast over here (may go mouldy, though).
We are in a drought mode right now, EVERYTHING is dry, our sandy soil is a fine powder, every footstep brings up a cloud of choking dust. The horse pasture is 2 1/2 acres, so not watering it, it would cost a fortune! We are on community water. Our normal yearly rainfall is 46 inches, so we usually get a lot of rain, just been a dry summer. We are waiting on rain to settle the dust, then we'll take the tractor to help push away the wood chip mulch in strips for planting clover and rye grass seed. At some point, we'll let the horses graze it, then plant bahia and giant Bermuda grass seed in the early spring. I am planning on 2 years to get pasture established there. Then we'll close the horses off the pipeline and repeat the process there. At the same time we are working on 3 other pastures for the sheep to graze, those pastures have a good start of Bermuda, will add bahia also. Eventually the plan is to have a good stand of mixed clovers, endophyte free tall fescue for fall/winter grass. Have to plant rye grass every year as even the perennial rye won't survive the summer heat. Then for summer, Bermuda and bahia. The sheep don't care for the Bermuda, but it is needed to provide a cover for the sand. Once bahia gets started, it will slowly take over the Bermuda, providing a good summer graze mix.
 

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It's a shame you can't watch the vids, Bay, as you could get some really good information from them about how to do that all cheaper and with less labor by using your livestock.

What is wrong with your internet? I have an ancient laptop I use here and DSL, so vids sometimes have to load, but nothing as slow as yours and we live out in the boonies.
 

Baymule

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Satellite TV and internet. The internet is a not so great plan, but it still costs nearly a hundred bucks a month. We are 7 miles from one town, 9 miles from another and 9 miles from another town, but there are no services. Go figure.
 

Sheepshape

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Bay, I feel for you! Our internet was The Worst up until about 6 weeks ago.....download speed 0.13mB/s. We are 11 miles from the nearest market town, lots of hills/mountains, no drains for fibres (which they wouldn't bother to lay as the population of the area is tiny) and no terrestrial TV either. So we have had satellite TV for years, but Sky don't provide internet to our area. So for years we struggled.

Most folk will never see this screen
Insufficient.jpg


For us everything changed when a little local company came along with wifi internet. Took ages to get all the masts up and running and the need to put a relay to our place on a neighbour's barn, but it eventually arrived. Installed on the back of a government grant and has dragged us into the 21st century with regards to internet. The only phone signal we have is via wifi on iPhones, but even that may change relatively soon via 'emergency call masts'.

But, Bay, it's SO difficult for folk who have cable to appreciate what living in the sticks can (though not always) do to connectivity.
 

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We live 20 mi. from the nearest town or cell tower, with many mountains all around~no TV, cable or satellite, but we have a landline phone. The phone lines are buried and this tiny telephone company that serves just our county offers DSL, which is surprisingly fast compared to when I had dial up way back when I got my first computer in the 90s.

My kids always complain about how slow my old computer is, but it's lightning fast compared to that old dial up, so I'm quite pleased with it. We get phone and DSL in one bill and it costs around $90 per month, unlimited usage for both.
 

Baymule

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At our old house, it was a local phone company, only a couple of blocks from our house. We got a land line, TV and internet for $110 a month. It was great, but I wouldn't go back if wild horses were dragging me. We love it here.
 

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Pasture walk with Greg Judy, parts one and two....incredibly informative, even for us small holders. Great tips in all areas of pasture development, how to graze, how to situate water and minerals in each paddock, etc.

He talks about how to graze the grass~what time of day the Brix levels are highest, what to look for in your livestock when grazing, etc. Just TONS of info in each video that can be implemented even by us folks on smallholdings.


 
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