Homemade ravioli

ragdollcatlady

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I am so excited...I just made homemade from scratch...ravioli....and they were great!

They are really, super easy. Not nearly as intimidating as I originally thought they were!

I have only made them 3 times before...the first was mostly a flop and we turned them into a casserole. Then I found ravioli molds for only $15 each a few weeks ago at Marshalls. This is the third time I used them and the ravioli are getting dramatically better each time.....

I plan on using a basic goat cheese this summer from my own goats, but in the mean time I am perfecting my ravioli technique. I am amazed that they are actually very easy to make, they just take a little time.

The recipe:

1 1/2 cups semolina flour
1 1/2 cups unbleached all purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
4 large eggs from our backyard chickens
2 Tablespoons olive oil
2 Tablespoons water

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I tried to mix everything on the counter with my hands like all the old time and authentic recipes tell you too.....Let me tell you, they lied to me! Everything ran all over, off the counter to the floor....and soooo did not work. I put it all in a bowl and mix just until it forms a nice ball of dough. Let it rest for 10-20 minutes while I mix up the filling.

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The best filling so far has been baby bella mushrooms, ricotta cheese, shredded parmesan/romano, basil, oregano, black pepper. The picture is of our pizza version with cottage cheese, crumbled goat cheese, parmesan, pepperoni, basil, oregano, and black pepper.

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I gently divide the dough into 8 portions and using my old rolling pin, and roll one so it is just a little bigger than the mold. It ends up a little thinner than a dime. Place one rolled sheet over the mold and gently fill each bowl in the mold with a small scoop of filling. Too much filling will ooze out and prevent the dough from sealing properly.

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Add the top sheet and using the smaller rolling pin that came with the mold, I firmly, but slowly and carefully roll over the top to seal the edges. Gently turn out the raviolis from the mold.... and they are made! Way cool!

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It only takes about 1 1/2 to 2 minutes to cook these and throw on your favorite sauce....Perfecto!

I plan on making a double batch of these to freeze for 2 future meals and using the dough scraps to make a lasagna casserole for that evening.

I did find that working the dough less makes them a little more tender, but fresh pasta definitely is a bit firmer...and the taste just can't be beat....Nothing like frozen!

Sorry about how dark the pics are...my kitchen has terrible lighting....but I enjoy recipes with pics better and with the pics you can see that it really is super easy.

If anyone else makes homemade ravioli....got any tips?
 

Back to Nature

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That looks good! I'm nervous to try ravioli from scratch.
 

Godsgrl

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So you make the dough and filling, throw them together in the mold, then pop them out. What comes next? Do you boil, bake, eat raw? Just kidding on that last one.
 

ragdollcatlady

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Just drop them into a pot of boiling water and in just a minute or two they are done! Just like you would with frozen, but frozen takes longer to cook. Once they float, you fish them out or drain if you are just making one batch and plate with your favorite sauce.

I have always been terrified to try making pastas from scratch. I don't have a pasta roller and some recipes say you need to put it through the roller twice to get it thin enough...I really can't believe how easy these were. and each time they get so much better. I thought that they would be difficult and tedious, but they really aren't that bad. I hope that anyone who has ever wanted to try them does.

I am actually not a big fan of pasta, but I do like the occasional lasagna and ravioli. My family loves any kind of pasta and by making these I can add some variety to the usual spaghetti or mac and cheese.
 

Baymule

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I tried making ravioli and it was a dismal failure. :( The first attempt was too thick and was a doughy blob. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th attempt was thinner dough, but tough, hard and yukky. The Italian sausage I made as filler turned out good though. Then found out later, that I should have used SEMOLINA flour! I had used all purpose flour and it was awful. Naturally, in my one-horse, podunk, small town, nobody has semolina flour. :/ I will find some and try again. Thanks for inspiring me!
 

ragdollcatlady

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Bobs Red Mill has semolina...that is the brand that I used. I know you can order it online, but it might be cost prohibitive that way.

I plan on trying it with all purpose alone at some point....I'll post if it works out or not when I do.

I did find that I prefer not to work the dough much past the nicely mixed stage and I try to use the smallest amount of flour on the counter for rolling as I can away with. The left over dough that comes off the sides of the mold the first time, does make a firmer ravioli if rerolled, so I just save those for lasagna casserole or spaghetti , best if you prefer the more tender ravioli. I just throw the scraps in a ziplock baggie in the freezer for later.

The dough does need to be thin, but I found that I have to check carefully that it has enough flour not to stick to the counter or pin as I roll. I keep a flour sifter nearby so I can just put a light sprinkling down as needed.

If the ravioli have too much flour on the outside when you are ready to cook them, just rinse in a colander before dropping into the water.

I hope you do try it and are successful! It was so cool when they came out great!

My very first time, I didn't have a mold so I rolled them on the counter. They stuck to the pin and counter, tore holes and we overstuffed them way crazy! I couldn't even get them off the counter intact! That is why we threw it all in a pan with sauce and baked like a casserole. Not terrible, but far from satisfying.

I was really afraid to try them again, but once I bought the mold, I had to make them in order to get my moneys worth. I was so excited I had to share. I am thrilled at how fast they are improving as well. Each time is dramatically better and easier.
 

ragdollcatlady

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OK guys and gals, so today I did a side by side comparison of my regular half semolina dough and a 100% all purpose dough.

I made them the same, cooked them up and served them on 2 separate taste tester plates, calling them plate 1 and plate 2.....

The verdict from my family was ever so slightly, for the semolina, mostly for flavor, though it was a very, very slight difference. It was almost a toss up on this.

One kid mentioned the texture of the semolina one was better, but just a little.

One kid admitted that for both the flavor and texture, he really couldn't tell the difference.

I personally could only barely tell the flavor difference, the texture difference was also small though I did prefer the semolina.

Now, that all being said, If I had to make them without semolina, I wouldn't hesitate. The family wouldn't notice the difference. It was really only because I told them there was a difference that they had any idea. Working the dough, I did notice that the all purpose was a little bit softer and didn't roll as evenly. It acted a little more like a bread dough, but again, only a little. I did have to use a little more flour and once cooked I think they were a little firmer.

So if all you have is all purpose, you can still make them. If you have access to semolina, especially if you give up easily, I would recommend starting with that. It is a bit easier to work with and to keep even while rolling, with less flour, so you have a more tender ravioli in the end.
 

bonbean01

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They look delicious!!!! :drool

My attempt years ago was a huge mess and failure...guess those need gadgets you have would helps so much....so...when can I come for supper and try them? ;)
 

Back to Nature

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I think homemade noodles taste too egg-y. Is there a way to make them less doughy/egg-y?
 
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