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Hoof trimmers

Discussion in 'Equipment & Supplies' started by Sophienee, Oct 2, 2018.

  1. Oct 2, 2018
    Sophienee

    Sophienee Chillin' with the herd

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    What hoof trimmers do you guys like? I'll need to trim for the first time soon and am unsure what to get.

    TIA
     
    goatboy1973 likes this.
  2. Oct 2, 2018
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Golden Herd Member

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  3. Oct 2, 2018
    Alaskan

    Alaskan True BYH Addict

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    Can't remember the brand... but we picked up an expensive pair of the kind that @Latestarter shows above. The reviews were way better than less expensive ones.. hold an edge longer.

    But we had one goat were we really needed a rasp to trim her hooves... just the way they grew.

    Also a hoof pick. It is handy to clean everything out. But I guess you could use almost anything as a pick.
     
    B&B Happy goats and Rammy like this.
  4. Oct 3, 2018
    secuono

    secuono Herd Master

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    I use horse hoof nippers now, FAR easier for me than any hoof shears.
     
  5. Oct 3, 2018
    Sophienee

    Sophienee Chillin' with the herd

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    LOL Yup goats. Sorry. Mom brain. Thanks everyone.
     
    Latestarter likes this.
  6. Jan 12, 2019
    goatboy1973

    goatboy1973 True BYH Addict Golden Herd Member

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    We use a small set we purchased from Tractor Supply Co. and then bought another bigger set that are serrated for bigger hooves. We don't have to trim hooves often but when we do, we like to be well prepared. When you are trimming hooves it is always good to have a small bucket of disinfectant to dip the trimmers into between goats to aid in the prevention and spread of hoof rot and other harmful bacteria. When we are finished trimming hooves, I always take the trimmers apart and thoroughly clean each part, put it back together, sharpen the blades, and spray it down with WD-40 before putting them away in my goat toolbox.
     
    Devonviolet likes this.
  7. Jan 13, 2019
    Sheepshape

    Sheepshape True BYH Addict

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    Over here we have the exact same hoof trimmers as Latestarter.

    Just to say that our veterinary advice is now not to trim hooves.I haven't had a case of footrot for about 4 years since I have been following this advice (bearing in mind that we have acres of mud in this soggy climate!). There's a so-called '5 point plan' for lameness over here. It involves seeing the animal as soon as you can, and definitely within the first 48 hours....examine the hoof and determine what the problem is due to. If there's scald ,common when the grass is long and wet and in young animals, then an iodine spray is all that is needed. If the hoof shows a lot of overgrowth, then the reason for that is down to the animal not placing their full weight onto that hoof (they're limping). If you cut back the overgrown hoof, then the tender area is exposed to the ground and they will limp more. When the animal can use the hoof normally and put the full weight on it, the hoof will rapidly wear off.

    If there's footrot, they are infectious and need to be isolated. A single injection of a long acting tetracycline and iodine pray to the hoof will usually cure it.

    The days of routine foot trimming are over (thank goodness)! However, there is still a place for the hoof trimmers. Sometimes there's a trailing piece of broken hoof either to the side of the hoof or under the base. It traps soil and little stones etcThis is what I use my foot trimmers for.

    So Use of hoof trimmers? 'Less is more' or so they say.
     
    goatboy1973 and Baymule like this.
  8. Jan 13, 2019
    Goat Whisperer

    Goat Whisperer Herd Master

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    That trimmer that LS posted is good for a few trims, but they don’t seem to hold up very long. We have been through several sets in the last couple of months. But they’ll work and you can find them easily.

    These are my favorite, but every time I go to order them, they are out of stock :(
    They stayed sharp and held up great.
    https://thegoatshop.com/products/silverline-hoof-trimmer

    Unfortunately this doesn’t seem to work with many dairy goats. When we had sheep they hardly needed anything done to them. Same thing with the meat goats. Dairy goats on the otherhand, oh my :th
    Because they are producing so much, they have to eat… a lot. Alfalfa hay and grain = fast hoof (& hair!) growth. I think if you were to sit and watch, you could see the hooves growing with your own eyes! They have to be trimmed to avoid getting this super long “elf shoes” that you see in some photos.

    Years ago we brought in a doe. Long story short, but the owner was going through more than any person should have to handle, so not beating anyone up.
    Anyway, her hooves were terribly overgrown. She walked funny. She was in discomfort. When I was at the farm, I asked if I could try to trim the hooves to see how bad it is. I took off a lot, but there was still so much to be done.
    It was so bad we had to call our vet out o sedate the poor doe a few days after I brought her home. The vet sedated the doe and we all went to work. Her hooves were horrible. At first you couldn’t see any rot or infection, but as we kept trimming we saw it. It took over 8 months of treatment and wraps. The doe had to adjust to walking on “new” feet. Her bones shifted. A lot of damage was done. There are still lasting affects but the doe is doing so much better. :)
     
    Devonviolet, Alaskan and Mike CHS like this.
  9. Jan 14, 2019
    Alaskan

    Alaskan True BYH Addict

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    I completely agree.

    But I think it also depends on where the goats live.

    My sister's place is rock with a bit of grass between the rocks.

    Her horses need just touch ups, and her goats, including dairy, scrub and meat almost never need to be touched.

    On my place though! My ducks need their nails trimmed! The dairy goats once a month at the longest.. a tiny trim every week was better... and the horses every 6 weeks without fail. :th