How to cover an acre of bare sandy soil in Texas summer to prevent erosion?

Coolbreeze89

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I have about an acre that has been completely torn up by a construction project. It will be wrapping up in the next few weeks, but that will leave me with a big area of bare white sand. My property is at the top of a “sand hill” so I get a lot of wind, too. I tried seeding some small patches last summer with Bermuda seed - I could get it to sprout, but even with twice daily watering, it all wilted in peak sun. So I’d love some ideas on how to minimize erosion (both wind and rain) til it’s cool enough to seed (with something - suggestions besides rye?). This area is around my house so I try to keep whatever grows on the shorter side. I love horseherb for shaded areas and I actively try to propagate it in shady areas, but both the size and sun make that untenable. In late fall I plant crimson clover in pastures and open areas further from my house, but I don’t want something that tall closer in (too hard to see snakes). I do have some goats and Kunekune pigs that graze and roam in this area, as well. I try to use native plants where possible, and because of the size, I’d prefer to grow from seed: Sodding is cost-prohibitive and I really don’t want to have to flood it with water in peak drought times.

My google searches only come up with suburban suggestions, so I thought I’d ask everyone here. Thanks!
 

StandingOakHomestead

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There are large mats of straw that you can buy for covering your garden as well. If you did that over the old hay, ideally layered with some manure.

Look into native grasses. The roots will set better and be able to deal with the weather like nothing else.

Being a hilltop I don’t think a wind barrier would do much but act like a big sail..but a shade cloth managed right could provide shade in blocks to let your grasses root as well.

Keep us updated and we’ll keep chopping up ideas.
 

Baymule

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I lived in Lindale before moving to Trinity county and was on white sugar sand. I used wood chip mulch. Just happened to run across a power line maintenance crew and let them park their equipment on our place at night, so they brought us over 100 loads of chipped up birdhouse, limbs and small trees.

I don’t see that happening for you. LOL You have received excellent advice in rolling out round bales of hay as well as purchasing straw matts. You can seed directly into either one once it gets half rotted.

I would plant Bahia. It’s more drought resistant than Bermuda.
 
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