How to get my breeding boer doe to lose weight a bit

Wild Bug Ranch

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Good evening people!!!!

I have a breeding Boer doe that is turning a year old at the end of Nov. She is quite large in the stomach area and looks like she is prego. How can I get her to lose that belly pooch so she doesn't look quite enlarged? Let me know!
 

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Good evening people!!!!

I have a breeding Boer doe that is turning a year old at the end of Nov. She is quite large in the stomach area and looks like she is prego. How can I get her to lose that belly pooch so she doesn't look quite enlarged? Let me know!
Well.... a huge belly simply could mean she has great rumen development, and is eating a bunch of brush.

A belly on a goat has little to do with fat.

For fat on a goat you look at ribs and spine.

You want to be able to feel the individual ribs, but not really see them. You want to feel the spine and not have it prominent or have it hidden.

You are aiming for condition score 3. However, often a heavy milker naturally settles more towards 2.

2 is better than 4.
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So... if you restrict her brush intake, the rumen is usually naturally smaller.

Not a good thing in my book, since less brush means you are now feeding her expensive grain or hay.

But maybe you need her to look sleek for a show???

I know close to nothing about showing.
 

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So... if you restrict her brush intake, the rumen is usually naturally smaller.

Not a good thing in my book, since less brush means you are now feeding her expensive grain or hay.

But maybe you need her to look sleek for a show???

I know close to nothing about showing.
Hi, Alaskan! I am not having her on brush since I do not have any currently in her pasture. She is indeed on orchard grass hay with her buddy. She is eating some goat chow right now along with her buddy but will not be having anymore once I am all out. For hay, she and her buddy get half a flake each feeding, so morning and night along with 1.5lbs of grain each feeding(she normally eats some of her buddies grain) I cut back on her hay intake and her grain intake as well.

I will get some pictures in a second and put them on here so you can see what I am talking about and we can go on from there!
 

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Do not mind that they are eating off the ground, one of them decided that its a good idea to step into the bowl and knock it over!!! LOL
 

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Again... I don't care about her belly.

But I do not see any sign of ribs, and I don't see any sign of her backbone.


To know just how fat she is, or isn't, you need to feel along her spine and compare her to the diagram I posted.

If she is dry and not pregnant, I am not sure why she should be having any grain or pellets.

Hay, a good loose minerals for goats, copper and selenium if your area is low, and just a handful of goat pellets for training.
 

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I have felt that and I can feel them but not see them. And I do all of that in the last sentence you have there.

I would say that she is possibly a 3 on the diagram you have.


Should I run her to gain muscle since I am breeding her next year and showing her as a breeding market goat so I will not sell her?
 

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I have felt that and I can feel them but not see them. And I do all of that in the last sentence you have there.

I would say that she is possibly a 3 on the diagram you have.


Should I run her to gain muscle since I am breeding her next year and showing her as a breeding market goat so I will not sell her?
Are you in 4H? Or FFA?

I think she looks fatter thsn a 3, but again I can't feel her.

Most people showing Boers do a bunch of exercises with them. Pulling tires, climbing halfway up a ladder to eat and all sorts of things.

But those things I have had very little to do with.

I suggest you ask someone knowledgeable in that specific area. So, if you are in 4H or FFA, you could ask the coach.

If you don't have a coach, I would stop by your local extension office. They probably have a handout that covers Boer showing and exercises for them.

You do want her right at a 3. Extra fat can make it harder to get her bred.
 

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A Boer is a meat breed. They are heavier than others. I really don't see an issue with that doe! She looks healthy and in good condition. Was she exposed to a buck?

I'm at a loss as to what you think is wrong with her.....I raised Boers and she'd be welcome in my herd. My does were usually bigger than her. A good Boer has the shorter leg and squarer body, good body depth. IMO her gut is fine.
 

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A Boer is a meat breed. They are heavier than others. I really don't see an issue with that doe! She looks healthy and in good condition. Was she exposed to a buck?

I'm at a loss as to what you think is wrong with her.....I raised Boers and she'd be welcome in my herd. My does were usually bigger than her. A good Boer has the shorter leg and squarer body, good body depth. IMO her gut is fine.
She was not exposed to a buck, she is turning a year old end of November and I am planning on breeding her in May of next year. She is about 11 months and 105-110lbs. Her mama was 165 and dad was around 180-200.
Are you in 4H? Or FFA?

I think she looks fatter thsn a 3, but again I can't feel her.

Most people showing Boers do a bunch of exercises with them. Pulling tires, climbing halfway up a ladder to eat and all sorts of things.

But those things I have had very little to do with.

I suggest you ask someone knowledgeable in that specific area. So, if you are in 4H or FFA, you could ask the coach.

If you don't have a coach, I would stop by your local extension office. They probably have a handout that covers Boer showing and exercises for them.

You do want her right at a 3. Extra fat can make it harder to get her bred.
I am in both. But I am showing in 4H. Those exercises I feel are used for market goats only since they have to target those muscles. I have done those with my market goats.
 
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