I like to start keeping bees in spring 2022…

WannaBeHillBilly

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Just set them on top of each other and the bees glue them together.

It is windy here so I do put a brick or cement block on top of the cover.
It is windy here too and there's also plenty of wildlife. I remember my uncle telling me about a wild boar knocking over one of his hives, so he had them strapped down to a pallet which was anchored to the ground with rebar. And there were those dowels…
 

R2elk

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It is windy here too and there's also plenty of wildlife. I remember my uncle telling me about a wild boar knocking over one of his hives, so he had them strapped down to a pallet which was anchored to the ground with rebar. And there were those dowels…
I have mine on pallets but the pallets are about a foot off of the ground to keep the skunks from disturbing the hives.
 

R2elk

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By the way, should i separate the two new hives from each other or can i place them on one pallet?
I have one hive per pallet and at least 10' between pallets. I recommend talking to your new mentor and following his recommendation.

At least one site recommends two feet between hives. For myself, I want full 360° access to each hive
 

WannaBeHillBilly

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I have one hive per pallet and at least 10' between pallets. I recommend talking to your new mentor and following his recommendation.

At least one site recommends two feet between hives. For myself, I want full 360° access to each hive
That rules out the location under my Tulip tree until i manage to terrace the hill-site. Installing a pallet there would allow me to access the hive only from the front and - limited - from both sides. Unless i stand on the pallet…
 

Field Bee

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That rules out the location under my Tulip tree until i manage to terrace the hill-site. Installing a pallet there would allow me to access the hive only from the front and - limited - from both sides. Unless i stand on the pallet…
Under trees and in shade isn't the best location for bees anyway. You dont have to use a pallet. Beekeepers are creative and use anything from landscape timbers to cinder blocks.
 

R2elk

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Under trees and in shade isn't the best location for bees anyway. You dont have to use a pallet. Beekeepers are creative and use anything from landscape timbers to cinder blocks.
Yes, definitely don't want the hives in the shade.
 

WannaBeHillBilly

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Under trees and in shade isn't the best location for bees anyway. You dont have to use a pallet. Beekeepers are creative and use anything from landscape timbers to cinder blocks.
I thought about placing the bees under that tree as it gives the hive a great deal of protection from rain, hail, high winds and other weather events. And i read somewhere that hives should not be placed in direct sunlight as it can get too hot inside.
 

Field Bee

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I thought about placing the bees under that tree as it gives the hive a great deal of protection from rain, hail, high winds and other weather events. And i read somewhere that hives should not be placed in direct sunlight as it can get too hot inside.
Im not familiar with your local temps and it would be a good idea to ask the beekeeper who is selling bees to you what he recommends. More sun is better, especially if you have hive beetles in your area which Im sure you do. In July and August, it can get up to 100 degrees F or more in direct sunlight here and the bees may beard, but they do thrive in the heat.
 

WannaBeHillBilly

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Im not familiar with your local temps and it would be a good idea to ask the beekeeper who is selling bees to you what he recommends. More sun is better, especially if you have hive beetles in your area which Im sure you do. In July and August, it can get up to 100 degrees F or more in direct sunlight here and the bees may beard, but they do thrive in the heat.
We rarely get to the triple digits during the summer, mid to upper 90's that's when the thunderstorms are being triggered and bring the temps back down. - hive beetles?! - scary stuff! I must ask about those around here. We definitely have those pesky varroa mites here.
So full sunlight it is. I need to paint two pallets with the same red barn and fence paint that i've used for the duck stuff and set them up near the veggie garden. This will also make it somewhat easy for me to set up an electric fence around the hives to keep the wildlife out. That paint It is basically just linseed-oil and rust, no harmful chemicals, and should be safe for the buzzers.
 

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