I never thought I'd consider a milking machine.....

Baymule

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Brain fart! Brilliant! I hope it works for you! You may want to consider a milking machine anyway, because of the arthritis. This will buy you time and maybe you can find a good deal on a used one.
 

canesisters

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Brain fart! Brilliant! I hope it works for you! You may want to consider a milking machine anyway, because of the arthritis. This will buy you time and maybe you can find a good deal on a used one.
.... yeah.. 😞.. back to the original post.
There is no way I can imagine having $500 - $1000 that isn't already earmarked many many months in advance.

I'll put it on my Christmas list 🎅
 

canesisters

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There's some improvement - and some increased sensitivity in the back quarters... probably because it's taking me SOOO LONG to finish them.
Today I separated them for about 4hrs & then guided the calf to only nurse the back quarters. Hoping that will help too.
I finished with them about 6 & will be back out around 4.
Is 10hrs too long for a 5day old calf?
 

Mini Horses

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@farmerjan says you're near me....???? I'm Suffolk area. You?

Don't know about length of time on nursing but guiding to hind quarters is good. 🙂. I sometimes have kids who only want one side and I have to divert.
 

farmerjan

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I used to figure 12 hours between nursings/bottles. That's standard for most dairies so no, not too long. The calf will be good and hungry and should be able to work on the back quarters with enthusiasm.
 

Mini Horses

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Great!!! Nature is best.😁. Appears you and the calf have solved your problem.

I asked your area because I would have let you borrow the milking unit to try and see if it helped you. It is battery powered, rechargeable. Plus, I have a hand pump unit -- Henry milker -- that would help for relief. No pulsator or electric but, does require some squeezing by hand, no noise. I've found it very helpful for a training animal as the hose allows for some distance and movement by the goat.

The unit I have is similar to one you referenced and excellent price. I find I can connect to smaller containers for isolating milk from each animal. I do that to be able to check taste and butterfat from the different does. Its a personal thing for me.😁
 

canesisters

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@Mini Horses I think I've talked myself out of buying it....
I've gotten almost equal opinions 'Sure, it's not premium, but it's better than not getting her milked out' & 'Don't do it!! It'll ruin her udder!'...

I remind myself multiple times a day that yesterday was ONLY a week into this. We're (all 3 of us) JUST starting to settle into a routine.
I'm my own worst critic - constantly tripping myself up with self doubt.
But, in the long run, that $150-$160 or so would probably be better spent improving fencing or something.
 
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