Introducing new herd members

ChickenAndGoatLover

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We currently have a small herd of Nigerian dwarf weathers (3). We are interested in adding an 8 week old doeling but are still pretty new to goats and I’m not quite sure how or if we can.

Our 3 wethers are NOT disbudded but the doeling is. Will this pose any issues? Will integration be ok considering their sexes and being banded?


All information and advice would be so appreciated. Thank you!
 

Donna R. Raybon

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If all youngsters they should get along. The 8 week old doeling still on bottle? If banding done correctly then they should behave much like a doe. Spend time to ensure nobody gets bullied. How long ago were they banded and how old are they now?
 

ChickenAndGoatLover

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If all youngsters they should get along. The 8 week old doeling still on bottle? If banding done correctly then they should behave much like a doe. Spend time to ensure nobody gets bullied. How long ago were they banded and how old are they now?
The 8 week old is just about weaned. Two wethers were banded about a year ago and one is getting banded Sunday. He is the youngest and is about 11 weeks old. We actually may be getting all 3 doelings from this specific litter not just the one. Better odds of getting along or worse?

Thanks!
 

Donna R. Raybon

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Better odds as the three new ones know each other so they will be more confident.:) The two from last year have enough horn to be a threat, just keep an eye on them. I would have a way to separate them into another pen if needed. If the two older ones do decide to be hateful, then maybe try the doelings with the 11 week old. Everybody will butt heads a bit until they work out pecking order. You just do not want .anybody getting ganged up on.
 

ChickenAndGoatLover

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Better odds as the three new ones know each other so they will be more confident.:) The two from last year have enough horn to be a threat, just keep an eye on them. I would have a way to separate them into another pen if needed. If the two older ones do decide to be hateful, then maybe try the doelings with the 11 week old. Everybody will butt heads a bit until they work out pecking order. You just do not want .anybody getting ganged up on.
Yes, they have PLENTY of horn to be a threat. That’s honestly my biggest concern but being a first time goat keeper I wasn’t sure if I should have more/bigger concerns with something else. We can certainly find a way to keep them separated if need be. Will this have to be a long term thing if things don’t go well the first time? Or wait until my girls and the new wether are a bit older? The 11 week old is not debudded either. He is coming from the same farm as our first two wethers. He was a tiny little thing when we first went and the runt. We were waiting for him to be weaned and banded.

I know that being humans and being new herd members are much different but I wasn’t sure if their personalities can tell me a little in advanced? The biggest wether in size is a bit skiddish. He has been since we got him but we decided to still get him and just work with him. He’s coming around a little bit but does have a ways to go. The smaller wether is an absolutely delight and loves to be snuggled up on and is much like a puppy lol

Thanks so much for taking the time to respond and help. We are indeed getting all 3 little girls tomorrow evening so please keep your fingers crossed for us!

I added some pictures of the girls for some cuteness!!
 

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Donna R. Raybon

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CUTE!!! I would have escape proof penning for three new girls so they do not decide to strike out for home and see how all goes.

As new to goatkeeping do you have thermometer, B vitamins, know how to give injections, etc? Moving and adding new herd members stresses everyone. Giving the three new ones B for two or three days is a good idea. When we used to show I gave B and Probios ( a probiotic gel) the day before we left and daily until we got back ( Th to Su) It really made a difference in they kept eating and drinking like they did at home. I always checked temp daily while showing and a few days after we got home. This helped me catch trouble early if anyone got sick.
 

ChickenAndGoatLover

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CUTE!!! I would have escape proof penning for three new girls so they do not decide to strike out for home and see how all goes.

As new to goatkeeping do you have thermometer, B vitamins, know how to give injections, etc? Moving and adding new herd members stresses everyone. Giving the three new ones B for two or three days is a good idea. When we used to show I gave B and Probios ( a probiotic gel) the day before we left and daily until we got back ( Th to Su) It really made a difference in they kept eating and drinking like they did at home. I always checked temp daily while showing and a few days after we got home. This helped me catch trouble early if anyone got sick.
We have 2 acres of electric fence penning so I think they should be ok. I believe they have electric fencing at their home now so I’m hoping they are aware of what it is and what it does lol. We will make adjustments as needed if needed. We do not have a thermometer or those vitamins but I need to order some ivermectin to have on hand for them all so I will purchase those things while I’m at it. Do you have a specific brand thermometer or vitamins etc that you suggest?
Thanks!!
 

Southern by choice

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The bucklings that are not 6 weeks past castration CAN breed your nigerian doelings. Nigerian does can cycle as young as 9 weeks. The bucks are fertile by 8 weeks. The "pipes" are still working for up to 6 weeks after banding or castration so you need to watch for that.

If your breeder has given you a good protocol than you should follow your breeders advice. If the breeder doesn't give you one than that is a different story.
I am not an advocate for taking temp daily on a new kid or giving injections. These are the very things that can add to stress when a goat is going to a new home as well as if the new owners is not skilled in giving injections. Baby goats are far harder to give injections to than adult goats and as a breeder of Nigerian Dwarfs I would never suggest these things to our clients. Temp fluctuates too much on young kids.

We have a strict protocol for our clients - we have never had a single goat (adukt or kid) get sick after leaving our farm to go to a new home, not a single one lost, no respiratory, no fever, no lethargy, nothing. If you have a good breeder and kids are healthy follow the breeders advice. BTW if the kid is banded and leaves same day that would be an additional stress and concern, iif being weaned at the same time then that is asking for trouble.
 

ChickenAndGoatLover

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The bucklings that are not 6 weeks past castration CAN breed your nigerian doelings. Nigerian does can cycle as young as 9 weeks. The bucks are fertile by 8 weeks. The "pipes" are still working for up to 6 weeks after banding or castration so you need to watch for that.

If your breeder has given you a good protocol than you should follow your breeders advice. If the breeder doesn't give you one than that is a different story.
I am not an advocate for taking temp daily on a new kid or giving injections. These are the very things that can add to stress when a goat is going to a new home as well as if the new owners is not skilled in giving injections. Baby goats are far harder to give injections to than adult goats and as a breeder of Nigerian Dwarfs I would never suggest these things to our clients. Temp fluctuates too much on young kids.

We have a strict protocol for our clients - we have never had a single goat (adukt or kid) get sick after leaving our farm to go to a new home, not a single one lost, no respiratory, no fever, no lethargy, nothing. If you have a good breeder and kids are healthy follow the breeders advice. BTW if the kid is banded and leaves same day that would be an additional stress and concern, iif being weaned at the same time then that is asking for trouble.
Wow... that was a lot of really useful information. I will absolutely watch for that and appreciate that a lot! The kid will be banded and leave the same day.. should we maybe wait until next weekend to get him? He is already weaned but the 3 girls are very newly weaned... are you saying if he is banded and weaned and moved to our house the same day that it’s asking for trouble? Or that just being weaned and moved in any situation is asking for trouble?
 

Southern by choice

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banded and weaned and moved to our house the same day
Those are 3 major stress factors. Each one is very stressful to the kid but all 3 together.... IMO bad move.
These aren't meat animals going to market. Are there lots of people that do this? Yes. They end up on this forum or others trying to figure out what is wrong with their otherwise healthy goat. Much depends on the individual goat and the management of the farm where you are getting them from.
If the kids are not on coccidia prevention (the south can have major coccida problems but it is not just a southern thing) they can have a bloom. Taking a fecal in within 4-7 days after you get them to check for coccidia is really important. Unless your breeder has another protocol. Probiotics are important and those are great to give.

The fact that he is weaned is great, the girls are newly weaned, that is fine... they are still weaned. I would ask the breeder to hold him for a week after banding if possible. They may charge you a boarding fee... but better then a goat coming in stressed, sore and then what? Are you able to tell if when he is standing off is it because he is sore from the banding? Or getting sick? Do you know what the scrotum should look like with banding? Have you been given any instructions?

I say these things NOT to scare you or disuade you it is because some breeders that are newer may not think to tell you these things, may not know, may know etc.
This is also something you should have knowledge of especially since you will have wethers. IMO it is one of the best resources on urinary calculi. We give this link to all our clients that buy bucks, oe wethers.
http://www.ansc.purdue.edu/SP/MG/Documents/SLIDES/Urinary calculi.pdf
 
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