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Is it safe to breed a four month old rabbit?

Discussion in 'Breeds and Breeding - Rabbits' started by woodleighcreek, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. Jan 7, 2012
    Ms. Research

    Ms. Research Herd Nerd On A Mission

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    Gotcha. Thanks, your reply really makes sense. Helps unwrap the brain and see what I witnessed with my own bucks. And understand that 4 months, if any breed doe is ready, it would be safe to try for a litter.

    K
     
  2. Jul 15, 2017
    Lionheadlover21

    Lionheadlover21 Herd lurker

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    Actually it's better to breed your does young so that when she's a little older she'll know what to do majority of does don't know what they are doing anyway with their first litter it doesn't matter how old as long as an appropriate breeding age im actually gonna wait until my doe is 5 months my buck is a month older than her.
     

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  3. Jul 15, 2017
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady True BYH Addict

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    Wow. 5-year-old zombie thread.
     
  4. Jul 15, 2017
    Lionheadlover21

    Lionheadlover21 Herd lurker

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    Lol yeah I know I'm late but just like I had the question and looked for answers some one else can do the same times have changed back then you couldn't wean kits til 8 weeks now it's 4-8
     
  5. Jul 15, 2017
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady True BYH Addict

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    Commercial breeders have weaned around 4 weeks for decades (maybe even centuries), because they are breeding their does back within a short time of giving birth, and they need the older litter out of the way so the doe can prepare for the next litter. They also expect some losses at weaning, something that a pet/show breeder finds really painful to deal with. Because young rabbits never have and still don't deal with stress very well, it is now illegal in a lot of states (mine included) to sell a rabbit less than 8 weeks old, whatever age it may have been at weaning.

    I have been keeping/breeding rabbits since the mid-80's. If I had a nickel for every time over the years that someone has told me "we bought a bunny at the pet shop, but it died," I could probably pay off my mortgage. I can just about guarantee you that what killed the vast majority of those rabbits was stress, even if indirectly. Whether it is nursing or not, a young rabbit that hasn't been removed from its mother's cage still has the same sights and smells and sounds and routine that it has always experienced, so has minimal amounts of stress to deal with. That's what the "don't wean 'til 8 weeks" thing is really about - minimizing stress.

    Rabbits haven't changed that much, the only thing that has really changed is what people are saying on the internet . . . . and that is kind of a "flavor of the month" thing.:confused:
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
  6. Jul 16, 2017
    Bossroo

    Bossroo True BYH Addict

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    Female Rabbits have been bred at first oportunity for millions of years before man got involved. The offspring have been weaned suddently at an early age when their mother has fallen to a predator and somehow many managed to survive in spite of the presence of predators in their home range or chased out of it to face realities of their new territory.
     
  7. Jul 16, 2017
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    We have a baby Jack Rabbit that has taken up residence in my yard. He can't be more than 4 weeks old, tiniest little guy but I guess he figured out where to find food (all the alfalfa he can eat) and water so as long as he stays away from the dogs (and my garden) he should be safe. Smart thinking for a young kit.