Is my wethers a buck?

Wild Bug Ranch

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I have a Nigerian Dwarf wether baby who got wethered using a new method. His balls are growing and they are supposed to shrink. Did the method not work and he is a buck? How do I know? I can do pictures if needed to
 

Ridgetop

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Precocious milkers don't milk much - maybe a pint. They take a lot of care too. Since I had others in milk who were star mikers this was not worth the effort so I dried her up. Once she kidded she milked copious amounts of milk. Unfortunately, she was our Toggenburg. Beautiful doe with a champion udder, but Toggs are known for their disgusting tasting milk! Probably used to make Limburger cheese! At the time we were not yet raising calves so we eventually sold all our Toggs. We had Nubians - best milk, LaManchas - good milk also, Alpines - didn't like their milk that much either and sold them, but the Togg milk was awful. At the time the Toggs stayed in milk when the Nubians went off to be bred but in order to stomach the taste and get the children to drink it, I loaded it with chocolate milk powder.
 

Mini Horses

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I can tell you that the Burdizzo method will NOT shrivel as fast. Plus, if an older goat they wiill often need to clamp differently. At any rate, when I do this "clamp" method, I do 2 clamps, one slightly above/below the other one....in case! It is obvious that it is uncomfortable when doing it....they scream!!! The banding seems faster and less issue, judging from their reactions. Hey, I had a friend call today to ask me to band two for her. This time she says 2 mo olds. Hope so, last ones were almost 4 months and well, she wasn't a good holder! It got done but, not before some wrangling and hog tying. Poor babies.
 

Bruce

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The Burdizzo method isn't necessarily new, but I don't think it's as common as a surgical castration or a banding.
Quite true, it was one of 3 methods we were taught in sheep class back in '76. That, banding and cutting off the bottom of the scrotum with a knife and pulling the testicles out with pliers ... or your teeth. I don't recall anyone in class volunteering to use their teeth. I do recall the poor little ram lambs not caring for the crush or pull methods, several passed out (the sheep not the students).
 

Ridgetop

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Isn't that the really old way - to use your teeth? You hear about old shepherds doing that but I wonder if anyone really did. LOL Pretty yucky, although no confusion about whether or not they are actually castrated!! LOL I wouldn't want to be a shepherd's wife though after he spent the day doing that. No welcome home kiss until after he brushed his teeth and used mouthwash!
 

Ridgetop

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There is also the possibility that the testicles are growing larger due to swelling. It is possible that there is an infection. The testicles usually shrivel and after 2 weeks it would be apparent however, if they are actually GROWING larger in size something is wrong If the burdizzo method failed, the testicles should remain similar in size to what they were 2 weeks ago when the procedure was performed, not grow noticeably.

Take the kid's temperature. Are the testicles hard? Do they feel hot? Are they more tender to the touch than normal? If they feel normal and there is no temperature then I would just go ahead and band him as if he had not been castrated. Better safe than sorry in my opinion. I don't castrate my market lambs anymore since they bring more $$ as entires, but since you are keeping these wethers as pets, don take chances.

If he has not had a tetanus (CDT) be sure to give him one to rule out tetanus. If he has not received his CDT shots then you will need to give him Tetanus Antitoxin which confers immediate protection when you band. Normal CDT vaccine does not give immediate tetanus protection. I give 1 ml to my lambs sub Q before docking along with their normal CDT sub Q vaccine. I give it under the loose skin in the groin. The action of the lamb's movement as it walks and runs keeps any vaccine lump from forming. Antitoxin gives immediate protection while the CDT takes a week or so for the tetanus portion to kick in. Since I band my Dorper ewes' tails I need immediate protection at or before 1 week old.

A number of years ago, the Australian lamb producers decided to try a different type of castration. Much of Australian lamb back then was produced from smaller wool breeds. The market producers wanted a faster rate of growth to a larger size. Ram lambs gain faster than wethers or ewes. High heat makes rams go sterile temporarily. The sheep producers decided to try a new method. Instead of the traditional castration methods, the sheepmen pushed the testicles up into the body cavity and banded the empty sac. The testicles were trapped in the body cavity and the higher body heat kept the rams sterile. I don't think this method is used any more though since there were other problems. While the ram lambs usually remained sterile until slaughter, testosterone continued to be produced. This encouraged ram behavior, and also might have changed the taste of the meat. I believe this was discontinued after a couple of years. Now most market producers have simply concentrated on producing genetics for faster growth. At any rate, it was an interesting experiment.

One of the problems you can have when banding younger lambs or goats is that one or both of the testicles can slip up and not be caught in the band. If this happens, just cut the band and try again.
 

Ridgetop

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I am confused. If you wanted to breed your doe to one of these bucks why did you castrate them? If you wanted wethers for pets but want to breed the doe ask the breeder if she will do stud service on the doe when it is time.

Since the doe is registered, why breed her to an unregistered buck? That doesn't make any sense. Instead, bred her to a registered buck of her breed. The kids will be more valuable and you will be sure of what you have in the final product.

Keeping a buck to use for one doe is too much work since you have to keep him separated from the doe except when breeding. Also they stink badly during breeding season and neither you nor your children will want to touch or play with him.
 

chickens really

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I'm confused because in another thread about Dixie you mentioned the breeder said you can bring her back for a free breeding. If they live down the road why don't you take her there and get her bred so she kids after January 1st to a registered Buck. I'm also confused about the new wether kids being castrated but not showing symptoms of castration. I would call that breeder back and explain your concerns. You say your too busy but have time to start threads. A phone call would take less time. I hope you get all your concerns figured out soon..👍
 

Ridgetop

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She is a year old. It is not uncommon to see the young immature udder show up in a yearling and the nipples become more prominant. Palpate the udder area. it should be soft and empty like a soft glove. If it is hard and firm, call the vet. Dry does can get mastitis. Dry does from heavy milking lines can also develop premature udders and become precocious milkers. I had one of these, who milked at a year old WITHOUT being bred. There is also such a thing as a false pregnancy. I have seen one of these too. If this is what is happening then when her body tells her she is at term she will pass the empty placenta and bellyful of fluid.

You said your breeder is close by, call her and ask her to look at the doe. If she is close to kidding which the appearance of a real udder would imply she would have been bred 4-5 months ago. You have had her 8 months with no bucks around, If that is correct she cannot be pregnant since she was never exposed to a buck.

If by some miracle she is pregnant, she is one year old and will give birth without any problems. Stop worrying. there is nothing you can do about it anyway except have her checked by the vet for mastitis. DO NOT CONSIDER LUTELYSE TO ABORT A SUSPECTED PREGNANCY. It will cause more problems than it would solve.
 
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