ISO Nigerian Dwarf - Is this a good idea?

WildersMilkMaid

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Good day to y’all. I’ve had a small herd of Nigerian Dwarf goats here in central/eastern NC for the past 4 years. I finally feel that I’ve gotten a good handle on raising goats, and now I am looking to improve my genetics for the future. I am in search of some does to add to my herd, preferably in milk.

Here’s my idea... I was hoping to buy some first fresheners being culled from way-better-than-mine herds for udder imperfections like lopsidedness... things that are not good enough for show, but would still provide a solid foundation for my herd. Does this make sense, and is this a good idea?

I am in it for the long haul, I have a long-term vision of breeding show-quality Nigerians with big beautiful udders and great milk production. However, I know that does not happen overnight, and I figure I have to start somewhere. Since it is (understandably) impossible to buy a perfect doe from a breeder, I think this is a good compromise. What do y’all think? *And is there anyone out there with such a doe, willing to sell?*

I am already on the waiting list for cull does from a nearby top-notch quality herd for the aforementioned reasons. However, I already have a doe from them (by FAR my best goat, she is amazing and perfect and I love her), so I was wanting to add a doe from a different line as well.

Please send me your advice, encouragement, and recommendations. Thank you for your time!
 

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WildersMilkMaid

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Unfortunately only one of my does is any good. Another is just okay, and the rest are quite lacking. Hoping to get on a better footing to start. I did not know what I was looking for when I first got goats, but I have learned quite a bit since then.
 

rachels.haven

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My advice is to take that money you were going to spend buying multiple does and buy a very, very nice buck from a top herd that shares your breeding goals and a second from a different, unrelated very, very nice herd. That is THE best thing you can do for your herd short of starting over. Then breed and retain, switch partners and breed and retain, offspring of one buck bred to the other. Retain, retain, retain, then cull down to your favorites once you have a decent number. That's the power of selective breeding
 

WildersMilkMaid

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Thank you both for the replies and solid advice. I definitely have plans for two great bucks in the Fall. I recently came into the opportunity to buy a truly wonderful doe, her doeling, and two doelings out of another amazing doe.

Do either of you (or anyone else who may come across this) have any recommendations for how to find herds with particularly high butterfat content? I have tried googling, and no luck.

Is butterfat something that is passed through the sire, or is it more from the dam? Or is it unknown? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Finding it hard to make friends with other goat people in these strange times we are living in!
 

misfitmorgan

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Thank you both for the replies and solid advice. I definitely have plans for two great bucks in the Fall. I recently came into the opportunity to buy a truly wonderful doe, her doeling, and two doelings out of another amazing doe.

Do either of you (or anyone else who may come across this) have any recommendations for how to find herds with particularly high butterfat content? I have tried googling, and no luck.

Is butterfat something that is passed through the sire, or is it more from the dam? Or is it unknown? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Finding it hard to make friends with other goat people in these strange times we are living in!

I believe anyone who is on or has done milk tests would know the BF% of their herd and animals. You could start there @OneFineAcre would know way more about then me though.
 
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