Johnes Disease

Scooby308

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I've been very conscious of disease prevention as I've visited several farms. Take my boots off and bag them before I get inthe car to come home then clean them with bleach solution. The more I read on the disease the more worried I get. We have a huge deer and turkey population here that roam from farm to farm.

While the rate of disease in wildlife is lower, what are the real odds? From what I've read, I believe that wildlife has a lower probability due to their ability to browse on different matters of forage and not being pinned in the same area. That said, there are lots of cattle farms in the area so they are coming into contact more than likely.

My land was a cattle farm that had a huge die out about a decade ago. When we bought it and started tinkering we found lots of dead cows. The land has lain fallow for at least 8 years with the exception of hay cutting in the last 2 years.

Am I being overly concerned?

http://www.johnes.org
 

Latestarter

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I know from your postings that you are, or seem to be, primarily interested in Nubian/mini Nubians. Since Nubians and their crosses seem to be the only goats affected by this possible genetic defect, why not choose a different breed? There are mini Alpines and mini Lamanchas (my personal fave), or I would guess even mini Saanens... All of which produce excellent milk... Just a thought. It might also open up additional opportunities for excellent stock, closer to home.
 

frustratedearthmother

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@Latestarter - are you perhaps thinking of G6S? That particular defect is indeed more prevalent in Nubians than other breeds. Unfortunately Johnes disease is an equal opportunity offender and can strike any breed of goat/cow/sheep/deer/bison/elk... or other ruminant.
 

Latestarter

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So sorry... cross thread ineptitude... I WAS researching G6S (for another post), not Johne's... My apologies!

"All ruminants are susceptible to Johne's disease." from many sources
 

Southern by choice

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You can have the soil tested.

Do you know why the cattle died?
The threat by wildlife is extremely low. You would also have guardian animal, I suspect, which will keep deer out.

Johnes.org should be able to tell you where approved labs are for testing.

So glad you are doing your research. :thumbsup
I am just shocked out how much old info and inaccurate info many vets have about this. I think Johnes org even did an article about vets not giving accurate info on the subject.
I don't really blame the vets, they are responsible for so many species and so much new info.
I am thankful for their work.
 

Scooby308

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An Anatolian is in the future. I'm hoping that hot wire along the top of the fence will help till then.

The previous owner was letting a fellow rent the pasture before we bought it. We found 2 dead calves in the barn and 5 dead along the woodline and another near the pond when we bought it. There were syringes all over the place. He thought he could stop whatever it was but failed.

The paddocks are nowhere near the barn or pond.
 

Southern by choice

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An Anatolian is in the future. I'm hoping that hot wire along the top of the fence will help till then.

The previous owner was letting a fellow rent the pasture before we bought it. We found 2 dead calves in the barn and 5 dead along the woodline and another near the pond when we bought it. There were syringes all over the place. He thought he could stop whatever it was but failed.

The paddocks are nowhere near the barn or pond.
:th :th :th :th :th

UC Davis just sent out their newsletter... says that the Johne's Test manufacturer has changed the limits for positive and suspect to increase the sensitivity of the test. :)

The big thing here is every goat owner really does have the potential to have this in there herd. Cannot wait til we are completely closed. We use the testing as a management tool. So far every year we test whole herd negative... but you know the new stock you bring in might have it and it just hasn't shown up yet. Always nervous.:hide

This year (actually 2016) we are moving to all fecal tests.

Wonder if it was severe respiratory that just went through or blackleg with the cattle. I know Kentucky went through some ridiculous weather with rain snow ice that was unusual for them last year. May have been the year before... Any neighbors know anything?

You will love an Anatolian... but get 2. :)
 

Scooby308

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The die off was before we bought the property,@ 10 years ago. It was way over grazed and he was feeding hay in summer. When we got it we used dad's tractor to drag all the dead into the feed lot. There was tons of hay we rolled over them and burned. The guy leasing it disappeared after we bought it. No clue? We still find bones from time to time cleaning around the woodline.
 

secuono

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Based on the website, no test is 100%, other than necropsy.
=/
So testing is kind of meh. If even animals with active symptoms come back negative, why bother?

Are they working on a better test that is more accurate?
 

Southern by choice

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Yes, necropsy is great- when the animal is dead and it has already been spreading it through your herd or flock.

No test is 100% that is why you do whole herd/flock testing.
If I have been testing for 5 years , whole herd, consecutively and every animal every year is negative that is a greater indicator than that of single one time test.

The majority of any kind of testing has its flaws but when used as herd management you certainly will have a better understanding of where you stand health wise.

Seeing how it can be passed through the milk this also affects breeding does, ewes.

Johnes is also zoonotic.

Affects all ruminants.
 
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