Kidding supplies

slifeh

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This will be my second time kidding and I’m wondering what everybody has on hand around kidding time. I felt unprepared last time and have a couple things in mind that I needed last time so I’ll make sure to have it this time but any other input would be great.
 

Alaskan

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More or less what @Jesusfreak101 said..

but also:

I got a kid puller. Inexpensive, but impressively handy if you need one.

Also, I got 2 different kinds of calcium magnesium etc. supplements specifically for before and after kidding...

And a few empty feed sacks to use as a tarp to cover the bedding can be handy.
 

Ridgetop

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I have a toolbox/stool - I think it was originally for gardening. It also provides a seat while waiting for the lambs to get up or the ewe to finish her job. LOL I keep everything in there except the large bottles of antibacterial soap that won't fit and the old towels. I do have a professional lubricant, but prefer the antibacterial soap for lubing when reaching into a ewe (or doe). I have a kid puller, tiny umbilical clips (rarely used, but good to quickly stop umbilical bleeding in emergencies when the cord snaps too short), a scissors to cut cords if necessary, a snot sucker (large nasal aspirator), cow size gloves, short gloves, medicine container with iodine for dipping the cord, a roll of paper towels to wipe my hands, and a couple other items in the box. A lot of what I have I seldom have to use, but I like to be prepared.

I keep a couple rope sheep halters handy to tie the ewe (always necessary if pulling a lamb). I also have a head catch panel in 2 of the jugs (accessible from either side) but often it is just easier to use a halter and tie the ewe (or doe) up short to the bars in the jug. I also have a drawerful of old towels, and a large bottle of antibacterial liquid soap in the laundry room to use when pulling kids or lambs. The towels give you traction on the slimy lamb. They are also useful for rubbing weak lambs and helping them breath after sucking out their nostrils with the aspirator,

I used to spread newspapers down to catch the birth fluids and after birth, but now I just deliver the lamb on the ground. If it is during a cold winter I spread straw in the jugs. If it is very wet in the jug I rake dirt or straw over the spots. Instead of trying to gather up the birthing stuff afterwards I just turn in one of the Anatolians to find the afterbirth. Since I don't stay in the barn after pulling lambs and making sure they are up and nursing I don't always see the afterbirth pass. Some of my ewes bury their afterbirth under dirt or straw, so having the dogs find it is easier and relieves my mind about them retaining placenta.

The essential thing is not what or how much you have in birthing equipment - it is whether you can find it in the heat of the moment before you panic! For that reason keeping everything in one container is helpful.
 
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