mystang89

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I've been thrown for a loop. No clue what's causing this.

Elsa, our newly purchased dame whom we are milking currently, seems to have some sort of hip dysplasia. She always walks as an elderly person who is trying to walk up many flights of steps. She has trouble standing. She sometimes loses her balance and falls to the grind, remaining there for some time. When she walks, her 2 hind legs drag the ground like a lazy child who doesn't feel like lifting his feet when he walks.

I've ruled out scald and foot rot. Looking at her build it looks ok. No open wounds. No missing hair.

She wasn't like this when we first purchased her, but seems to have begun exhibiting signs of feet trouble within a day of being here. We've had her for a month or more now and nothing has gotten better.

We have no vet close to us that work on sheep, the closest being 40 minutes away. None make house calls. No way of getting her there even if we did have the money for a vet visit, which we don't.

I'm all ears for something I've missed.
 

mystang89

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Thank you all very much! Both articles very interesting. I think I will start with the cider vinegar drench today since I don't see that hurting anything at all and then when paid again, will give her the shots for the worm (safe guard, panacure).
 

Beekissed

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Thank you all very much! Both articles very interesting. I think I will start with the cider vinegar drench today since I don't see that hurting anything at all and then when paid again, will give her the shots for the worm (safe guard, panacure).
Is she on a good mineral that's high in selenium?
 

mystang89

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It's difficult for me to know what is a "good" mineral feed even after all this research I've done and I don't have the ingredients list for what I do use. When I buy it again I'll post it though.

Also, upon further research I don't think I'll be giving a shot for the worm but will be focusing on selenium and vitamin e.
 

Beekissed

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It's difficult for me to know what is a "good" mineral feed even after all this research I've done and I don't have the ingredients list for what I do use. When I buy it again I'll post it though.

Also, upon further research I don't think I'll be giving a shot for the worm but will be focusing on selenium and vitamin e.
That's where I'd start, plus trying to get some good selenium into their supplement or feed. If you use two different solutions and one works, you'll never know which one worked...so if the selenium and Vit. E doesn't work after a couple weeks, then I'd try the wormer.

I've found that black oil sunflower seeds are high in selenium and it's something they'll eat along with any other grain based feeds you may be giving. That's something you could add a little of to feed each day also.

I also place ACV (with the mother) right into their drinking water...not too much or they don't like to drink it, but enough to give them a little boost during this hot weather.
 

Mini Horses

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On line you can generally pull up the label for the product. Just a thought. Vit E can be bought in human vit section as can selenium in some locations. You can use several tabs to reach amount she may need.


Just quick thoughts that I would consider in my own "limited time & funds" situations. :D =D
 

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The general nutritional components of black oil sunflower seed are:
  • 28 percent fat.
  • 25 percent fiber.
  • 15 percent protein.
  • Calcium.
  • B vitamins.
  • Iron.
  • Vitamin E.
  • Potassium
    11 Foods High in Selenium
    • Brazil nuts (these are one of the richest sources of selenium in food) [1]
    • Mushrooms.
    • Seafood, especially oysters and tuna.
    • Beans.
    • Sunflower seeds.
    • Meat.
    • Poultry.
    • Liver
 

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