Late foster

Gary

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I have 3 does with 4 week old litters. I had moved some around to even them out but now two have 7 each and because a few died, the third doe is only raising two kits. At 4 weeks is it to late two move a few in with the doe that only has two?
 

B&B Happy goats

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I have had 4 week old kits survive on their own ( New Zelland) without any problems...I would feel comfortable fostering them to another doe....But two with seven kits and one with two kits, nonthing is broken , why move any of them ? If everyone is thriving, jusy leave them be :thumbsup
 

Gary

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Thanks. Makes sense. Also, I switched my rabbits from coastal hay to alfalfa a while ago. Is it necessary or is feeding them coastal fine?
 

Bunnylady

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I have fostered 3-week olds, but since a lot of people start weaning at 4 weeks, I don't understand the need? 4 week old bunnies should be getting most of their nutrition from the feed they are eating; the doe's contribution is much less. I don't usually wean that young, but I've had litters that were orphaned at 4 weeks, and they did fine on their own. When I think about the risks (doe attacking the "strangers," or simply the stress of the move) I don't really see a benefit to moving them at this age.

Alfalfa is usually much higher in protein than grass hays, so rabbits will probably gain weight faster on alfalfa. Alfalfa is also higher in calcium. For nursing does and growing litters, that may be a good thing, but calcium can contribute to the formation of kidney stones (a very bad thing) if fed to rabbits that don't have a need for extra calcium in their diets.
 
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