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Latestarter's ramblings/musings/gripes and grumbles.

Discussion in 'Member's "BackYardHerds" Journals' started by Latestarter, Apr 21, 2016.

  1. Oct 12, 2017 at 5:25 AM
    Mini Horses

    Mini Horses Loving the herd life

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    Sorry about the mower......at least you got MOST cut.

    Notice how we all just keep on "talking" on your thread -- while we wait for you to return??? :lol:

    Are you still milking? Rebreeding does? How's Mel?
     
    Baymule likes this.
  2. Oct 12, 2017 at 7:12 AM
    greybeard

    greybeard True BYH Addict

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    Ah yes, now I remember. As my former shop foreman once said "Troy shouldn't ever have built a dam thing".

    I stay way away from hydrostatic transmissions on anything except the higher end mowers and tractors.

    I am not a fan of cutting down good forage unless it's to make hay with.
    How many linear feet of fence do you need built to increase your stocking rate and let that forage turn into milk and meat?
     
    Baymule, CntryBoy777 and Pastor Dave like this.
  3. Oct 12, 2017 at 10:28 AM
    Jeanne Sheridan

    Jeanne Sheridan Chillin' with the herd

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    What we are feeding now is a mix of orchard, timothy,and wild grasses. The goats and llamas both seem to love it and we get less dropped feed than before because it is very fine stem. When we have hay put in next spring it will be a similar mix. We showed it to our vet and he gave us the go ahead. We are doing alfalfa as pellets for everyone and with their height it's easy to make sure the llamas get their share. Even our big mama goats can't reach the llama's bowls. If we do find a local source we can afford of alfalfa we can do a hay mix into the feeders. We hope to have all our babies back out in fields by the weekend. When they are out there we use less than half a bale of hay a day. It's taking time to clear the blackberries from the fence line to get in to replace the barb wire with mesh. Some of the canes are more than an inch in diameter. We are working are clearing a two foot path along the fence but that means cutting them off at the ground and along both sides of the path. It has meant that we have lots of blackberry leaves for the goats and llamas. There is grass in the pasture they are in and we have been giving them wind fall apples.
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.
  4. Oct 12, 2017 at 10:40 AM
    Jeanne Sheridan

    Jeanne Sheridan Chillin' with the herd

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    I know what you mean about the expense of alfalfa. We don't have a way to handle the big bales so it is just 65 pounders for us. The best price we have found is $13 a bale and because it is so rare here he sells out in days. With a pellet alfalfa added to a mixed orchard, timothy, wild grass hay we are getting as much as 2 gallons per goat per day from our big Nubians. Our mixed breed and Nigerian are less but still a decent amount so I think the mix we are using must be working for them. We do wish we could find a local source of alfalfa for good price.
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.
  5. Oct 12, 2017 at 12:08 PM
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    I have no shortage of places to buy alfalfa in No. CA but I am never thrilled with the prices. I pay about 16.00 for a 110 lb. bale at a feed store and 13.00 for the same bale from my hay guy. But I buy the BIG bales as it is easier to slide it off my dump trailer than it is to stack the smaller bales. I can pay between 160.00-200.00 for one of those bales depending on where he buys them, he isn't growing it, he is brokering it.
     
  6. Oct 12, 2017 at 1:24 PM
    Jeanne Sheridan

    Jeanne Sheridan Chillin' with the herd

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    We get our regular hay right out of the field for $3.50 for 65 lbs. If we have to get it from his barn it's $4. We have no way to get the big bales up in our hay loft, the 65 pounders are tough enough. So little alfalfa is planted here that the feed store almost never has a supply.
     
    CntryBoy777 likes this.
  7. Oct 12, 2017 at 4:55 PM
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave True BYH Addict

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    @Jeanne Sheridan, I'm not sure your method on removing the blackberry bushes, but I am thinking chainsaw, bull dozer, or even burning to clear 'em. Nor sure your potential of keeping critters away while working, but surely noise or fire is a deterrent.
     
    Mini Horses and CntryBoy777 like this.
  8. Oct 12, 2017 at 8:18 PM
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master

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    Clearly you need to tie the goats just out of reach of the fence so they can do all the work for you.
     
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  9. Oct 13, 2017 at 4:26 AM
    Jeanne Sheridan

    Jeanne Sheridan Chillin' with the herd

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    We have a hard blade Stihl Weedeater that lets us get in to cut the canes without getting torn up by the thorns. We have a chainsaw but it doesn't have the same reach. Burning is not a option. Though they lifted the summer burn ban last Friday, you can't do open brush burning. We had too dry of a summer. We would love to be able to do it with a bull dozer but there is a culvert on our side of the fence and not enough clearance through trees on the other side for most of the length of the fence line. Farm land is different here than the areas where I grew up in California and Montana. They carve the farms out of the forest. When our place was build in 1915 they cut the fir trees down to clear the land then milled it on sight to build every thing. The trees were 6-8 feet in diameter. The forest now is second or third growth but they are still big trees. We talked about tethering a couple goats out there to work on the blackberries but we have cougar, coyote, and bear up in the trees. Normally that wouldn't be an issue during the day but a bear is coming down after apple trees on our fence line to fatten up for the winter. Neighbors have also spotted a couple young adult cougars checking out livestock. They call the county but the cats are always gone before help arrives.
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.
  10. Oct 13, 2017 at 5:48 AM
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave True BYH Addict

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    That is a lot of obstacles to be sure. Sounds like you have your work cut out for you. I can't relate with the big predators. The biggest we have is coyotes. I guess I would be pretty uneasy with bear and mountain lions roaming around. Good luck with your ventures.