Learned about market sheep and how to raise a sheep

Show Sebright

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
27
Reaction score
65
Points
61
Location
Orlando Florida
Hello, I want to do market sheep one day and I want to know if anyone have anything that could help me get ready for this huge project. Anything form how you raise you sheep to even how to shave them down. I want to be very known on sheep before I start raising my own.
@Baymule (did is add you right?)
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
22,080
Reaction score
56,230
Points
823
Location
Northeast Texas
Yes, you added me, you can use the @ in front of a name to call people to your posts.
@misfitmorgan dont you raise club lambs for FFA and 4-H kids? Got any pointers for Show Sebright?

@Poka_Doodle dont you raise show lambs?

@Ridgetop did your kids show market lambs?

I don’t know the finer points of market lambs, but they do and are a wealth of information. I’m glad you joined BYH, you will like it here.
 

misfitmorgan

Herd Master
Joined
Feb 26, 2016
Messages
3,295
Reaction score
5,963
Points
403
Location
Northern Lower Michigan
Hello, I want to do market sheep one day and I want to know if anyone have anything that could help me get ready for this huge project. Anything form how you raise you sheep to even how to shave them down. I want to be very known on sheep before I start raising my own.
@Baymule (did is add you right?)
Hello @Show Sebright, welcome to BYH.

As @Baymule mentioned yes we breed sheep for 4-H/FFA. We specifically breed suffolk sheep however suffolk, hampshire, polypay and speckle are all pretty common market sheep. The parent stock are important, make sure you get a good look at the parents or at least the ram and then ewe group. The first thing we look for in our breeding stock is size.....we want the biggest suffolk we can find for our breeding program.

After that we look at confirmation of the parents, do they stand square, is their back level, are their heels up, do they have single teats, do they have a good palette, etc.

We look for more because we breed, for yourself basically you want the parents to look like a big block with a neck and head sticking out of the top of it, make sure they are standing up on their heels, and have a wide rump when looking top down. For the lambs make sure to pick one whose shoulder is slightly higher the the rump, that means when you brace them in the ring they will be square.

You will want to get your lamb approximately 4 months before your fair/show, the lamb should be 8 weeks old when you pick them up. If you are getting a bottle lamb you will want it to be 6 months old for your fair/show. A whether is preferred to a ewe unless your fair/show has separate sex classes which would be unusual.

For shearing, if you can talk to your other club members you can get help with shearing or some clubs bring in a person to rough shear the sheep. Then you just have to finish with fine shearing/detailing, you will want all shearing done 1 week before your show and the final wash 2 full days before the show then sheet them. Make sure to use a conditioner after the soap.

There are several brands of show sheep feed, Purina Honor Show Chow is pretty common here.

If you can see pictures of the parents freshly shorn that helps a great deal. If you want a good idea of what you are looking for google with have many answers for you. Also dont forget to have fun!
 

Show Sebright

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
27
Reaction score
65
Points
61
Location
Orlando Florida
Hello @Show Sebright, welcome to BYH.

As @Baymule mentioned yes we breed sheep for 4-H/FFA. We specifically breed suffolk sheep however suffolk, hampshire, polypay and speckle are all pretty common market sheep. The parent stock are important, make sure you get a good look at the parents or at least the ram and then ewe group. The first thing we look for in our breeding stock is size.....we want the biggest suffolk we can find for our breeding program.

After that we look at confirmation of the parents, do they stand square, is their back level, are their heels up, do they have single teats, do they have a good palette, etc.

We look for more because we breed, for yourself basically you want the parents to look like a big block with a neck and head sticking out of the top of it, make sure they are standing up on their heels, and have a wide rump when looking top down. For the lambs make sure to pick one whose shoulder is slightly higher the the rump, that means when you brace them in the ring they will be square.

You will want to get your lamb approximately 4 months before your fair/show, the lamb should be 8 weeks old when you pick them up. If you are getting a bottle lamb you will want it to be 6 months old for your fair/show. A whether is preferred to a ewe unless your fair/show has separate sex classes which would be unusual.

For shearing, if you can talk to your other club members you can get help with shearing or some clubs bring in a person to rough shear the sheep. Then you just have to finish with fine shearing/detailing, you will want all shearing done 1 week before your show and the final wash 2 full days before the show then sheet them. Make sure to use a conditioner after the soap.

There are several brands of show sheep feed, Purina Honor Show Chow is pretty common here.

If you can see pictures of the parents freshly shorn that helps a great deal. If you want a good idea of what you are looking for google with have many answers for you. Also dont forget to have fun!
Thank you so much. I never would have thought about what age to get them at. If I don’t have at the experience and equipment for a very young lamb. Should I just look for a 8 week old ram lamb? Do you know any good breeders in Florida? Again thank you for the help. Is it ok if I continue to contact you for information on market lambs?
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
22,080
Reaction score
56,230
Points
823
Location
Northeast Texas
When you say “market lamb” are you talking about a meat breed sheep shown in market or club lamb classes or are you wanting to raise a lamb to put in your freezer? They are 2 completely different scenarios.
She is doing her homework on raising a lamb for FFA. Still has a couple of years to go, I think the excitement of raising a lamb is great. You have all kinds of experience that I don’t have and I’m sure you have some pearls of wisdom for this up and coming sheep farmer.
 

Show Sebright

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
27
Reaction score
65
Points
61
Location
Orlando Florida
When you say “market lamb” are you talking about a meat breed sheep shown in market or club lamb classes or are you wanting to raise a lamb to put in your freezer? They are 2 completely different scenarios.
So I get a lamb (some how) and I raise it till fair that is in late February early March. It is for FFA and I don’t plan on eating him. This year are fair the separated the lambs by white face lamb and black face lamb. I was watching at fair this year to get an idea of what they do. My hope is when I sell him/her that I am able to break even in money. I am hoping it I know what I am doing I can avoid a $200 vet visit (also the closest vet for sheep is 2 hours away). So yeh, this is for FFA and I do showmanship with my lamb then they get judged. Then at the end of the long week you do an auction.
 

Poka_Doodle

Herd Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2015
Messages
3,007
Reaction score
1,937
Points
333
Location
Colorado
Hello @Show Sebright, welcome to BYH.

As @Baymule mentioned yes we breed sheep for 4-H/FFA. We specifically breed suffolk sheep however suffolk, hampshire, polypay and speckle are all pretty common market sheep. The parent stock are important, make sure you get a good look at the parents or at least the ram and then ewe group. The first thing we look for in our breeding stock is size.....we want the biggest suffolk we can find for our breeding program.

After that we look at confirmation of the parents, do they stand square, is their back level, are their heels up, do they have single teats, do they have a good palette, etc.

We look for more because we breed, for yourself basically you want the parents to look like a big block with a neck and head sticking out of the top of it, make sure they are standing up on their heels, and have a wide rump when looking top down. For the lambs make sure to pick one whose shoulder is slightly higher the the rump, that means when you brace them in the ring they will be square.

You will want to get your lamb approximately 4 months before your fair/show, the lamb should be 8 weeks old when you pick them up. If you are getting a bottle lamb you will want it to be 6 months old for your fair/show. A whether is preferred to a ewe unless your fair/show has separate sex classes which would be unusual.

For shearing, if you can talk to your other club members you can get help with shearing or some clubs bring in a person to rough shear the sheep. Then you just have to finish with fine shearing/detailing, you will want all shearing done 1 week before your show and the final wash 2 full days before the show then sheet them. Make sure to use a conditioner after the soap.

There are several brands of show sheep feed, Purina Honor Show Chow is pretty common here.

If you can see pictures of the parents freshly shorn that helps a great deal. If you want a good idea of what you are looking for google with have many answers for you. Also dont forget to have fun!
Basically what she said:lol: Weaver offers a free fitting poster with the purchase of any of their products and I think that would be useful. When it comes to feed, it definitely depends on what your breeder recommends. If you can afford to do it, I strongly recommend attending a show camp to get some hands-on help.
So I get a lamb (some how) and I raise it till fair that is in late February early March. It is for FFA and I don’t plan on eating him. This year are fair the separated the lambs by white face lamb and black face lamb. I was watching at fair this year to get an idea of what they do. My hope is when I sell him/her that I am able to break even in money. I am hoping it I know what I am doing I can avoid a $200 vet visit (also the closest vet for sheep is 2 hours away). So yeh, this is for FFA and I do showmanship with my lamb then they get judged. Then at the end of the long week you do an auction.
Ok, so couple things I need to warn you about. Lambs do not do well on their own, either get two, or get a lamb and a goat, sorry to break it to. Second, I would not have been able to get through my first year without having such a good relationship with my vet. Luckily she is my best friend's mom, because on my birthday, one of my lambs ended up getting rather sick. Also, having lambs who came from a slightly different climate, the heat was hard on them sometimes during the summer.
When it comes to breaking even, that is a fantastic goal, but do know, for me I was out $100 in equipment per lamb, not counting shears, sprays and other hair and show products, or the fitting stand. I could look up my feed bill for you too if that would help, and then when sale came, if I would have sold a lamb, I would not have made back what I bought him for.
Just all FYIs, I loved my lamb project last year and just met my next year lambs today.
 

Show Sebright

Ridin' The Range
Joined
Mar 14, 2021
Messages
27
Reaction score
65
Points
61
Location
Orlando Florida
Basically what she said:lol: Weaver offers a free fitting poster with the purchase of any of their products and I think that would be useful. When it comes to feed, it definitely depends on what your breeder recommends. If you can afford to do it, I strongly recommend attending a show camp to get some hands-on help.

Ok, so couple things I need to warn you about. Lambs do not do well on their own, either get two, or get a lamb and a goat, sorry to break it to. Second, I would not have been able to get through my first year without having such a good relationship with my vet. Luckily she is my best friend's mom, because on my birthday, one of my lambs ended up getting rather sick. Also, having lambs who came from a slightly different climate, the heat was hard on them sometimes during the summer.
When it comes to breaking even, that is a fantastic goal, but do know, for me I was out $100 in equipment per lamb, not counting shears, sprays and other hair and show products, or the fitting stand. I could look up my feed bill for you too if that would help, and then when sale came, if I would have sold a lamb, I would not have made back what I bought him for.
Just all FYIs, I loved my lamb project last year and just met my next year lambs today.
If my friend is doing a show lamb with me do I need to get a goat for them? When you say shears, are there like a certain type you suggest?
 
Top