Wehner Homestead

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This theoretical at this point. Diamond is due any time and is quite the producer. Since our main goal is milk production right now (without sacrificing udders and overall confirmation to stand the test of time) we are considering keeping a buckling. She's bred to a buck named, Tuck, and his sire is a buck named, Lone Ranger. Lone Ranger is also the sire of Caramel and Snowflake.

I also have completely unrelated does that I could breed Diamond's buckling to until the time I want to try.

I have unrelated bucks to breed Diamond, Caramel, and Snowflake to also.

The tentative plan would be to wait two full generations to cross Diamond's buck back on Caramel and Snowflake's offspring. This would give me a chance to see how his full sisters develop and some of his own offspring from other Does.

So Diamond's buckling would be bred to his great-great neices. Do you think that is far enough to avoid "inbreeding" and the associated concerns?
 

Goat Whisperer

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I wouldn't be too concerned about it, especially if you are keeping the kids to see how they turn out.

Is the Diamond/Tuck breeding an outcross?
You can go at ADGAgenetics and generate planned pedigrees.
 

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Wehner Homestead

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The Diamond/Tuck breeding is an outcross.

I definitely don't want the COI to be too high. What do you consider acceptable or is it related to how many animals contribute any inbreeding?

I need to get my farm and herd registered with ADGA so I don't just get the login screen when I try to do things.
 

OneFineAcre

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Breeding to his great-great nieces isn't really that close
The COI will also be contingent upon other animals in the pedigree
Do Diamond and the others already have an animal on both sides of the pedigree?
I have some that have the same animal twice on the dams side and then again on the sires side
 

Goat Whisperer

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The Diamond/Tuck breeding is an outcross.

I definitely don't want the COI to be too high. What do you consider acceptable or is it related to how many animals contribute any inbreeding?

I need to get my farm and herd registered with ADGA so I don't just get the login screen when I try to do things.
It depends.
It’s not so much the the actual %, it’s the animals that you are line breeding off of.
I know some do father/daughter and I’m not a fan of it personally. When you linebreed, you are “cementing” certain traits into those kids, grandkids etc. Those traits are then harder to correct- might not be a big deal at first, but after years of breeding it can be nearly impossible to correct the issue.

Some think outcrosses are rather silly, because you don’t know how the kids are going to turn out, but I have to disagree.

This is from one of my old posts here on BYH:

I know of a lamancha doe that died due to an enzyme problem that was linked to her tightly linebred pedigree @ 26% if I remember correctly.

The highest appraising alpine doe SGCH TEMPO AQUILA LIVING FREE 95 EEEE was 4.21% linebred.

The highest appraising Nigerian Dwarf SGCH Old Mountain Farm Swift-Leigh 93 EEEE (@ 4-03) is a complete outcross.

Just things to keep in mind.
I think line breeding really helps bring in consistency to a herd, however it can end up in a disaster as well.
 

babsbag

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I frequently breed my kids to their sire but that is where it stops.
 

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