looking to buy a horse

CLSranch

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Ditto to all suggestions. Some people do Face book, Craigslist etc.... because that's all they know. Others because nobody in their little circle (which includes horse buyers) wants it. Some horse traders are just like car dealers. Auctions are another option but only go with someone you trust, who goes a lot and knows the people there.

There is a song about a new want to be horse trainer and an old horse trader. Old man rides horse and has wonderful dreams about the potential, later he takes the un rideable horse back to the old man who buys him back for LESS money and then says "Son ain't you ever heard of ACE"
 

Bicoastal

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The horse market has exploded during COVID-19. Pre-COVID $3000 - 4000 horses are now commanding $8000 - $9000. I would budget at least $7,500 for the purchase price.

I suggest starting by finding riding lessons near you. This will get you dialed into the local horse community where word of mouth will find you the best candidates. I strongly recommend a PPE and asking/paying your trainer to check out the horse before you pay full price and take possession.
 

Field Bee

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My wife just bought a horse from New Vocations. She couldn't be happier, little hearts are flying all over the place when they're together. He's an excellent riding horse with an excellent pedigree to match and 100 % sound. Good luck, I hope you find a great horse.
 
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microchick

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I'm so excited for you! Congratulations! I got my first horse when I was 16 and kept horses for over 10 years before life turned me into a city dweller for a while.

My best advice is if you see a horse that you like and want to take a second look at, have a vet who is an equine vet, arrange for him to meet you and check the horse over for you. Trust me, my first horse had laminitis and we didn't know until she had a bad flare after a trail ride. I'm sure a vet would have caught it, knowing what to look for, before my parents bought her for me and we could have kept looking for a better animal.

You will want to know that the horse you choose has a sound heart and lungs, good teeth and no problems with it's legs or hooves.

Stay away from sale barns. If your area has a riding club that isn't being throttled by the pandemic, hang out there and talk to people. I bet there are more leads there than you can shake a stick at.

Good luck. And we expect to see a picture of your lucky steed when you find him or her.
 

Chenyn77

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hi, im new. my parents FINALLY are letting me get a horse on one condition. I come up with all of the money by my self. which is not a problem for me anyways that's not the question. how to I know if im prepared or not. here is what I have so far

plenty of pasture space

cows for a buddy incase the horse gets lonely

me a rider who can ride practically everyday

etc.

so I've got all of the niceties now where do I find a horse? I was browsing "EquineNow.com" but they have limited options. is Facebook a trustworthy site to look for horses?
thanks in advance
Why not contact the ASPCA and adopt a horse? They have many wonderful horses looking for someone to love them.
 

messybun

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Check a slaughter barn. I have seen so many good, and I mean GOOD, horses from our local slaughter barn. Some of them were papered quarter horses and thourough Breds. Basically great horses that people couldn’t afford anymore and sold to get them off their feed bill. If I could afford them you better believe I would have taken some! I know people who loved their old lesson horses as well. I only know of one who lived into their forties. Most will pass a bit sooner, which is sad on one hand, but on the other if you’re wanting to move out sooner then later having a smaller time limit may be what you’re looking for.
 

Ridgetop

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All good ideas for you. If you can join a horse club you will meet a lot of people who will be able to help you. And many will be able to recommend people that are selling their horses. Children grow up and go off to college and often will sell their horses. We got a terrific mare that way. Divorce sales are other ways - 2 of our best and favorite horses came together from a divorce sale by word of mouth. Children often outgrow good gymkhana horses. They graduate into more expensive jumpers or show horses. DD1's horse was one like that. Terrific little horse - alo y kids rode him and dd1 showed in gymkhana and hunter /jumper classes. He died with us at 32 years old very much loved. Actually, we have been luck =y to et all our wonderful equine buddies retire and die of old age with us here.

Get a calm, well broke, mid age horse experienced on trails. Make sure it will load in a trailer. Since you live in Michigan make sure it will cross water. Lift feet , examine teeth and make sure the horse is easy with all that. You don't want to discover any problems after paying out cash and taking the horse home. Big OOPS! Done both. Unless you have the desire and money $$$ to show, get a nice trail horse. Not sure how old you are, but stay away from specialty horses like Saddlebreds, gaited horses of all breeds, etc. Gaited horses are for easy long distance riding on the flat. I love mine, they are wonderful and sweet natured, but they are not for kids to cowboy, gymkhana, and have fun on. They really are not good if you want to ride with friends that don't have gaited horses! Gaited horses walk as fast as others trot and your friends want want to ride with you. Personal experience. You are young and will want to do gymkhana and play days so a nice saddle horse about 15 hh. wilL be nice. I actually prefer 14.2 or 14.3 hh because they are easy on and off for games. Ever notice that working cowboys don't have super tall horses? Tiring to climb on and off when roping cattle. You lose time in games trying to get onto the tall horses.

Get a vet check no matter what the price. It has saved me a lot of money over the years. Don't buy if the horse is saddled and waiting for you. You want the owner to catch the horse in front of you. Preferably in a corral - not in the barn. Stay away from young green broke horses. They are not as enjoyable on the trails since you have to be schooling them all the time. You wat t have a nice easy horse to enjoy with friends. This doesn't mean it won't have a lot of spunk.

My uncle was a rodeo rIder and horse trader - his warning to me - DON'T TRUST HORSE TRADERS! :gig
 

DragonflyFarm

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Good for you! Congrats!

I agree with Physhyr and Bicoastal though. The initial cost of a horse is a drop in the bucket. Having pasture is important, but since you live in Michigan, you won't have good grazing year round. Check, out the price of good grass hay in your area. Do you have a dry place to store it? What kind of shelter do you have for your horse? Your horse may need additional grain and/or supplements depending on what you'll be doing with him and his body condition. You will also need regular farrier visits, and at least annual vet care for vaccinations and exam. You can probably worm him yourself if you do your research. You should start a fund for emergencies. Again, research colic and founder/laminitis. They are two of the biggies. I would highly suggest a pre-purchase exam by a horse vet. There are many things that you don't want any part of that aren't visible just by looking at a horse. It also gives you a chance to check out the vet who you will probably call for regular health care.

You will need to invest in well-fitting tack, like saddle, bridle, saddle pads. Again, since you're in Michigan, a waterproof, breathable horse blanket. Do you have a friend who has a horse trailer?

Joining Pony Club or 4-H are excellent suggestions. Can you trade mucking stalls at a local stable for lessons with their trainer? It would give you a better idea of what to look for in your new mount, and they probably know of suitable horses for sale if they see you ride.

Horse rescue sites are a good place to look, but again, a pre-purchase vet exam is essential. One site I recommend is rescueme.org

Good luck!

 

Chickenlover0810

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Good for you! Congrats!

I agree with Physhyr and Bicoastal though. The initial cost of a horse is a drop in the bucket. Having pasture is important, but since you live in Michigan, you won't have good grazing year round. Check, out the price of good grass hay in your area. Do you have a dry place to store it? What kind of shelter do you have for your horse? Your horse may need additional grain and/or supplements depending on what you'll be doing with him and his body condition. You will also need regular farrier visits, and at least annual vet care for vaccinations and exam. You can probably worm him yourself if you do your research. You should start a fund for emergencies. Again, research colic and founder/laminitis. They are two of the biggies. I would highly suggest a pre-purchase exam by a horse vet. There are many things that you don't want any part of that aren't visible just by looking at a horse. It also gives you a chance to check out the vet who you will probably call for regular health care.

You will need to invest in well-fitting tack, like saddle, bridle, saddle pads. Again, since you're in Michigan, a waterproof, breathable horse blanket. Do you have a friend who has a horse trailer?

Joining Pony Club or 4-H are excellent suggestions. Can you trade mucking stalls at a local stable for lessons with their trainer? It would give you a better idea of what to look for in your new mount, and they probably know of suitable horses for sale if they see you ride.

Horse rescue sites are a good place to look, but again, a pre-purchase vet exam is essential. One site I recommend is rescueme.org

Good luck!

We have an one acre pasture that would be split in half cause we have a couple beef cows, we have a dry place to store our hay. I will be riding western (barrel racing, poles etc) might need grain in the winter cause there will be no grass available. We own a horse trailer. My friends who have had horses for years offered to assist me in learning more about horses. Don’t have the time or budget for paying for horse lessons. I’m in the process of looking for a job(not going very well) thanks for all your guys help!
 

Baymule

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A one acre pasture will not support a horse, much less a horse and couple of beef cows. It will be trampled into a dirt lot in no time. Plan on hay and feed every day, not just in the winter.
 

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