Messybun’s fence problems.

messybun

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Hello everybody. How do you repair welded wire?
I believe that’s what this is. I’m no fencing expert.
I’ve been told to just reweld it, but I don’t have a welder and can’t really afford one. Is there any other way to fix this?
This fence has been up for a few years now, but with the goats pushing against it sometimes the welds pop. I have electric on the inside, but it’s down more than it’s working. Thanks in advance.
 

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CLSranch

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That's what a lot of mine looks like. I am a welder and ain't about to try to weld it back together. You can straighten it by hand use hog rings or tie wire/bailing wire and crimp the pieces back together where they overlay. Add some stakes where it's real bad and maybe a barbed wire over the top that you can attach it to every few feet to keep it from getting pulled back down.
The easiest is to replace the sections that are bad.
 

Alasgun

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Re-welding fence wire would be an effort in futility! Simply overlay it with another piece, a larger piece that covers the damaged section. If the new piece is a foot larger in all directions you’ll be fine. When you cut the repair piece, leave the tags and twist them into the damaged section all around.
 

messybun

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So, I repaired the holes! But my small goats can push under the wire! :somad I have welded wire on t-post with insulators for braided hot wire. Any ideas on how to make it so they can’t get under? With it being spring everyone is obsessed about the other side of the fence because there are weeds and grass on the other side. It should subside once there is enough food growing in the pen, but until then this just isn’t acceptable. TIA
 

Alasgun

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If the electric fence wire is around 4 inches off the ground on the inside of the other fence, where they would touch it first, i’d think that would hold a goat?
this time of year there’s not a lot of growth to interfere with the fencer, or if it’s a ”weed burner” it wont matter😳
 

messybun

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If the electric fence wire is around 4 inches off the ground on the inside of the other fence, where they would touch it first, i’d think that would hold a goat?
this time of year there’s not a lot of growth to interfere with the fencer, or if it’s a ”weed burner” it wont matter😳
My electric wire is a pain in the neck and is always on the fritz. Every time it rains it goes out, and the goats run out and start tearing it down with their horns. I’ve had three different boxes, all with the same problem. Even our electrician friend, who has livestock, doesn’t know what’s wrong with it.
 

CLSranch

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I had 3 strands of hot wire with a charger good enough for a bear inside of a barb wire fence to keep goats in. I don't have goats anymore because they (1 who taught the rest) learned to back up and take a run at it. I had a good dog that would run around that pasture from the front porch and run them back in, then I'd whistle her back.
The old saying with goats is if the fence won't hold water it won't hold a goat.
With that being said you need multiple hot wires and one where their nose will touch when they try to get to the greener side. That goes with all animals you don't want to shock them after they have their head past that line,,, they may jump forward.

If you have more strands (I don't know how many you have) they are less likely to be able to hit it with their horns without getting zapped somewhere else.
I hope this helps.
 

CLSranch

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Cattle/Hog panels with electric on the inside is the best I have found to be efficient. Oddly a comparative price to rolled wire like horse fencing, NOT welded wire in price per foot.
 

messybun

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And...we’re back again with problems. Same goat (she is truly getting on my last nerve) pushes under the fence. I tightened the fence last night, repaired the electric wire, and put up some barbed wire on the fence, though probably not enough of it. The electric fence is basically null and void so it doesn’t matter how many strands of hot wire I put up, the two I have already don’t work. My “pasture” isn’t that big, but a ten mile charger will barely zap a fly around the back of the fence. No one has been able to figure out its problem. No weeds, fully strung, not touching the fence. The only thing I could think it there is a section where I had to go from poly rope to plain wire, both are conductive though. Super well grounded, covered box. All a charger could want. Should I put barbed wire around the bottom few inches of the fence? I’m afraid I’ll tangle a goat up and injure them, but do y’all have another non electric solution?
 
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