Messybun’s Small starts big dreams

messybun

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That’s good! @Baymule! Thank you.
So, while I was out for a bit yesterday apparently someone was messing around my back fence yesterday. We watched for much of the night, but had to go to bed eventually. It almost looks like someone tried to pull up a post too. So, barb wire going up! I’ll have to check the electric fence too. I hate this time of year. Anyway, be careful y’all.
 

Nao57

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Regarding the opening post...

I think the best thing you can do is show the family how your projects will reduce the grocery budget considerably (and make sure they do), while also showing them how the grocery store prices are increasing exponentially.

And its true also.

2020 potato price is double that of 2019. The 2020 10 pound potato bags cost the same price as the 2019 20 pound potato bag price (from earlier in the year). And this is the Walmart price.

Wheat price used to be able to go on craigslist or wherever and buy wheat berry bags for around 25 cents on the dollar. This year there's a big shipping fee plus they are now around 65 cents on the dollar and you can't get them for cheap on craiglist now, or other online venues.

Other grains have gone up. Some are hard to find. I can't see any field pea and barley seed bags for sale in my area right now for the economic farm price.

What people don't realize is that WHEAT is the back bone of America. And grain and hay feed everything literally in some form or another before the end product of what has processed that goes to your grocery store.

So you just show them how your projects can benefit them. Then organize them to try to use your product before going to the store. And then show them the food inflation.

IMHO your dogs aren't going to be producers.

You could probably get a couple more rabbits.

Rabbit math; bag of alfalfa pellets, 12 or 13 bucks...for 40 pounds. Young rabbits gain 1 pound for every 2 pounds of food they eat. You harvest them at a certain age before the gain slows down. That's less than a dollar per pound of food.

Chickens and ducks also have great gains like that.

Are you using the goat for dairy sources? And maybe it'd work better to use the goat hair for wool than the poodle?

Hope that helps you a lot.

I'm sure your family members have noticed the big increases in food prices recently. Mine did too. But I spent some time explaining it to them, and with what they are seeing on the news of the cities becoming lawless they have been coming around surprisingly fast. Now my sister is doing chickens also.
 

Nao57

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Whoops lol. I’m in hurricane central. Even though we have been blessed to not have been severely affected this year. We have similar climates I believe! Definitely not up north like NY, no thanks to all that snow!
I actually am working on breeding my own bugs already! My dragon eats mealworms, so I plan on breeding excess anyway. My neighbor has some gorgeous purebred silkies, and she told me I could grab whatever eggs that aren’t already being sat on, yay! Hopefully I will get some cuties next month.

You could feed the ducks and chickens nubia roaches from a nubia roach farm, I think?

But it would get odd looks from your family and won't help anything. (And if they get lose you'll suffer a family faction hit big time.)
 

Nao57

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What state are you in? Cottage laws vary from state to state, some are better than others. Animals on the premises.....do they think you have goats and chickens living in the house? Gheesh.

When you say cottage laws...is that an official term?

I hadn't heard it before. Thanks.
 

Mini Horses

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Yep ... Official term. Some states are making no sense with rules.

Here in VA you can sell certain baked or canned goods with no inspections. Some products only from the farm, no delivery. Some anyway, just limited $ amounts in total annual sales. Raw milk a no-no but, herd shares work as you are then consuming your own animals milk, even tho you have animal milked and cared for by another. Oh, you can sell raw milk for craft or animal feed use. I do NOT want to know Fido is hubbys nickname. Also labeling rules with some items, not for others. :idunno ;):hit:hide. States vary on rules!

Sell meat on hoof....if parceled out and packaged, different rules. We find ways to make it work but, watch your liability. A closed, knowing network is best.
 

messybun

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Regarding the opening post...

I think the best thing you can do is show the family how your projects will reduce the grocery budget considerably (and make sure they do), while also showing them how the grocery store prices are increasing exponentially.

And its true also.

2020 potato price is double that of 2019. The 2020 10 pound potato bags cost the same price as the 2019 20 pound potato bag price (from earlier in the year). And this is the Walmart price.

Wheat price used to be able to go on craigslist or wherever and buy wheat berry bags for around 25 cents on the dollar. This year there's a big shipping fee plus they are now around 65 cents on the dollar and you can't get them for cheap on craiglist now, or other online venues.

Other grains have gone up. Some are hard to find. I can't see any field pea and barley seed bags for sale in my area right now for the economic farm price.

What people don't realize is that WHEAT is the back bone of America. And grain and hay feed everything literally in some form or another before the end product of what has processed that goes to your grocery store.

So you just show them how your projects can benefit them. Then organize them to try to use your product before going to the store. And then show them the food inflation.

IMHO your dogs aren't going to be producers.

You could probably get a couple more rabbits.

Rabbit math; bag of alfalfa pellets, 12 or 13 bucks...for 40 pounds. Young rabbits gain 1 pound for every 2 pounds of food they eat. You harvest them at a certain age before the gain slows down. That's less than a dollar per pound of food.

Chickens and ducks also have great gains like that.

Are you using the goat for dairy sources? And maybe it'd work better to use the goat hair for wool than the poodle?

Hope that helps you a lot.

I'm sure your family members have noticed the big increases in food prices recently. Mine did too. But I spent some time explaining it to them, and with what they are seeing on the news of the cities becoming lawless they have been coming around surprisingly fast. Now my sister is doing chickens also.
Thank you. Basically, if we have the space, budget, and time for it I can get whatever I want. The deal is also if I get it I take care of it(although my family does chip in I don’t count them in my time) so it’s more that they don’t get why on earth I want too lol. My outdoor rabbits have not historically done well, and are sooo bad for allergies.
 

messybun

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You could feed the ducks and chickens nubia roaches from a nubia roach farm, I think?

But it would get odd looks from your family and won't help anything. (And if they get lose you'll suffer a family faction hit big time.)
No roaches here! We have enough naturally and the chickens won’t eat them because they will make them sick. But meal worms suit me just fine!
 

Nao57

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No roaches here! We have enough naturally and the chickens won’t eat them because they will make them sick. But meal worms suit me just fine!

They make the chickens sick? Does that mean all chickens get sick from them? And would ducks also get sick from them?

Thank you for your input.
 

Nao57

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Thank you. Basically, if we have the space, budget, and time for it I can get whatever I want. The deal is also if I get it I take care of it(although my family does chip in I don’t count them in my time) so it’s more that they don’t get why on earth I want too lol. My outdoor rabbits have not historically done well, and are sooo bad for allergies.

Wow.

Yeah I get allergies too.

I get less allergies from my ducks than I do anything else. (Chickens, ducks, rabbits). But ducks are a bit more noisy than chickens (except roosters). But the ducks have a cuteness factor that has made the neighbors love them. (That might help if you are thinking which animals do less allergies, though I get that some people have different allergies than others.) (And maybe part of ducks doing less allergies is because people don't pick them up as much.)

I have been told a rumor...or wait maybe it was a comment here that if you brush the rabbits often they won't have dander and cause allergies. But I haven't had a chance to test if its true or not. (Good luck).

Re: outdoor rabbits not doing well, can I ask why? Thanks.
 

Baymule

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That’s good! @Baymule! Thank you.
So, while I was out for a bit yesterday apparently someone was messing around my back fence yesterday. We watched for much of the night, but had to go to bed eventually. It almost looks like someone tried to pull up a post too. So, barb wire going up! I’ll have to check the electric fence too. I hate this time of year. Anyway, be careful y’all.
Why would someone be messing with your back fence? That doesn't sound good at all.
 
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