Minerals for Horses + Other Stock

LMK17

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We currently have a few head of cattle + goats on our property, and we are bringing in some horses soon. Right now, I leave out both cattle minerals + goat minerals (and baking soda + DE) for free-choice consumption. Occasionally the goats nibble the cattle mineral, and I assume the cattle get at the goat minerals once in awhile. No biggie.

Can anyone help me out with horse minerals? Ideally, there would be some formula that would work for all our animals without the need to buy species-specific mixes. (I realize that's very unlikely.) But perhaps the buffet approach would work? If so, what should I offer? And are the cattle & goat minerals in any way unsafe for horses? Do I need to offer the other animals their minerals in an area that is inaccessible to the horses? (I prefer the more natural minerals/blocks, such as those from Redmond, FWIW, and we never feed anything medicated.)
 

thistlebloom

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This is something that probably depends a lot on what minerals your regions soils lack. I don't supply a mineral mix for my horses other than a salt lick that contains selenium, and a Redmond salt block. Are all of your animals going to be sharing a common area? I don't know if cattle minerals contain anything a horse shouldn't have. This is probably a good question for your vet.
 

LMK17

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Thanks. The question is on my list for the vet next week. Also on my to-do is to have a forage test and new soil tests done this spring. In the meanwhile, I've just been offering the cattle a general mineral mix. The goats are a bit tricker, as I have a more difficult time finding a "natural" mineral that supplies a high amount of copper. Redmond doesn't offer one, although they say they're considering bumping up the copper content of their goat minerals. Right now the horses have pressed mineral + salt blocks, which I'll probably not purchase again. I just bought those because it's what they were used to at their old farm. They also have a Redmond rock, which all the livestock can access because it's hanging on a cross fence.

For the time being, the horses & cattle are on opposite sides of a single strand of hot wire. The goats can go under the wire and so float back and forth. I have the cattle & goat minerals where the horses can't access them. However, I plan to run the horses & cattle together when we begin strip grazing again in the spring.
 

thistlebloom

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I would be interested in being informed of your vets answer. We're in different areas, but I know for sure our soils are selenium deficient. A good question for me to ask my vet when she comes out for the next dental appointment.
 

Duckfarmerpa1

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Thanks. The question is on my list for the vet next week. Also on my to-do is to have a forage test and new soil tests done this spring. In the meanwhile, I've just been offering the cattle a general mineral mix. The goats are a bit tricker, as I have a more difficult time finding a "natural" mineral that supplies a high amount of copper. Redmond doesn't offer one, although they say they're considering bumping up the copper content of their goat minerals. Right now the horses have pressed mineral + salt blocks, which I'll probably not purchase again. I just bought those because it's what they were used to at their old farm. They also have a Redmond rock, which all the livestock can access because it's hanging on a cross fence.

For the time being, the horses & cattle are on opposite sides of a single strand of hot wire. The goats can go under the wire and so float back and forth. I have the cattle & goat minerals where the horses can't access them. However, I plan to run the horses & cattle together when we begin strip grazing again in the spring.
ou can actually just look on a website for your county minerals...it’ll bring up a picture of your state..zoom in on your county...and it’ll list the mineral count for your county. It obviously won’t be as exact as testing your property...but it could be a good place to start. I wrote all my mineral counts down, just for easy access, in my binder, in case I need to know a certain one.
 
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