Moldy bedding

Duckfarmerpa1

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To my understanding, they get it from breathing in mold spores from hay, feed, straw, etc...It creates an allergy to the mold and then they are sensitive to it all the time...but...I, new to this, and still doing research....

for me...when I’m raking...and I see wet...I just go...and go..and just keep digging it out until it’s dry as a bone all the way through. Then start up
 

Baymule

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If it is a mold that makes you uncomfortable or uneasy, I would dig it out and get started on deep litter.

I spread the dropped hay, but I put leaves in the barn up to 3 feet deep. The hay goes over the leaves. Sometimes I buy the compressed pine shavings at Tractor Supply too. We are going to rake up more leaves, the sheep have stomped down the first round and we have plenty of leaves.
 

Sheepshape

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What is Farmer's Lung, please? :eek:
It is a disease of the lungs due to an 'allergy' to moulds/dust in hay/silage etc. Causes coughing and progressive shortness of breath. Most of us won't be affected, but there's no knowing who may be sensitive, so best to avoid contact with mouldy stuff by wearing a mask during handling.
 

Beekissed

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So if you found some mold in the wet lower layers of bedding, would you leave it alone? How do you know if it's a potential hazard?
Yep, I'd leave it alone. I don't worry too much about molds here...I've seen my sheep EAT moldy hay like it's candy, preferring it over fresh, good quality hay. That hay was 20 yrs old and had been in an old barn all those years but the sheep AND the neighbor's cattle broke down a fence and dug under tarps to eat it. I had stored it to use on the garden and had always heard moldy hay was taboo for sheep....until I saw my sheep eating it with no problem whatsoever.

As long as you have great ventilation, the fresh air and wind should disperse mold spores just fine. In DL, molds/fungi are what help the material to break down, so as long as you create air pockets in your DL, it should progress well.

https://pittmoss.com/blogs/the-pittmoss-blog/is-mold-in-your-soil-good-or-bad-lessons-in-soil-microbiology

I know folks down through the ages have had issues with mold and livestock, but mostly that's in places that have no good air flow and too much moisture. Controlling those two things can eliminate the danger of "mold". Creating air spaces or even just aerating(as with turning with a fork, chickens or pigs) and good passive air flow that comes in at the bottom and out at the top can help disperse excess moisture and fungi spores so they are not a respiratory issue.

Get some dry material on it, aerate the mass, open up more ventilation and monitor.
 

YourRabbitGirl

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Congratulations on the new animals! I don’t have sheep, but I love my goats to pieces!! And I’m glad you were able to clean out their bedding pretty easily. :)
Its always a good idea to properly fix the bedding... there is nothing as too warm for the animals, the cold weather is the issue. hope they are doing fine... have a great day.
 
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