Mountain lion in the area

Mini Horses

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Was gonna suggest the hot wire Bay said, top & bottom, heavy charge. Sounds like your bull is as much of a problem as a dog. 😁😁. Some days I wonder why we keep on keeping on! 😋.

No dog or bull but, some of my goats can be naughty! Hated to sell one of my bucks this year but could not keep him in! Even cattle panels. And he unplugged the charger! 😠
 

Ridgetop

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We have 6 acres fenced with welded oil pipe and 5' woven wire. However since we live on top of a steep ridge some of our fences had become 3' high due to earth sloughing down against them from the upper side. We attached T posts to the verticals with pipe clamps and used cheaper welded wire to extend the fences higher. Now they are about 8' all around the property. This is because over the past 30 years our area has become less livestock friendly and we don't want our Anatolians to roam like our Pyrenees used to do.

We have a majority of coyotes here, occasional stray dogs, bobcats, and at least once a year or so, cougars. Our property is very steep ad the house and pens sit on top of the ridge with steep sides and a severe ravine at the back. As long as we have LGDs we do not lose anything to any of these predators. We lost animals before we had our first LGDs (Pyrenees) and between LGDs. The only time we lost anything to predators while having LGDs was to a large pack of wild dogs when they killed our old Pyr (age 11) and chased off the 6 month old Pyr. The second time was after the Creek fire when we were overrun by coyote packs that had been driven into the neighborhood by the loss of habitat from the fire. Our two Anatolians were lured away from the sheep and a coyote (or several) killed a lamb. The coyotes were not able to eat the lamb or carry it off since our dogs returned and drove them off the carcass sustaining several bite wounds in the process. We added a third Anatolian at that time. We have had livestock here for 33 years and everyone else loses animals including pets regularly.

With respect to cougars, as Baymule said, barking will usually drive it off since it is a stealth hunter. Stealth hunters lose their advantage to surprise prey if LGDs are consistently warning the neighborhood that they are present. With respect to cougars though, you should have at least 2 LGDs for protection. If you live i an area where you have several cougars whose territories overlap your property you will eventually have one try to make a kill. In that instance 3 or 4 LGDs will be necessary to fight it off. In the case of pack animals, the number of predators requires multiple LGDs.

We have 3 Anatolians ranging in age 8, 4, 18 months, and will eventually add another in about a year or so since the eldest LGD at age 10 will lose physical agility, although her knowledge and cunning will still be useful to train new LGDs. It is important to add your new LGD pups at certain ages in order to have the older dogs able and willing to train them. If the older dog is too old, they will not be willing to put up with a pup. If they are too young, they will not have the necessary knowledge to train. Adding the new pup when the older dog is around 3-6 years old allows the pup to have a mentor that is still young enough to play, but old enough to discipline the pup and train it.
 

Becky C.

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A few years ago, we Lost one of our Doe's to Cougar... we had no Guardian dog at the time just our house dogs ( a Pitt Bull & a Rott/Shep Mix) Both were great in protecting them for a while, We live in Oregon ( Rural area) & we Have LOTS of wildlife come thru our Property.. & on the Hillside behind us ,we had a few Cougars Watch us through out the day... Animal Cameras from Neighbor showed where they sat .. Or we would see them ourselves through out Day.. spooky when you go out at Night with no flashlight.... state removed menace Cat. after our Loss... shortly after we bought a LGD > Great Pyrenes /Anatolian Shep/Akbash Mix ... He Is Wonderful....Since a little Pup he has lived with Our girls..(Does) & has protected them since... Have not seen any Cats around in Person Or on Camera's. Praying we never do again.. but still may one day... Love him much... & he has connected with our girls well... as he has gotten older & Breeding season, Births & Milking.. he is always there.. looking on as a protective Uncle during birth making sure 'm not hurting the Momma or baby, & wiggles as he sees them born to the bratty Big brother who picks on younger siblings( young Goats) ( Never has hurt any) to the protector as I go milk, He steps in between me & Babies or the Momma doe as I go get here.. letting them in first then checking me out (Every day) before he lets me touch them( He nudges me away -- doesn't bite) We are looking for a female to add soon... Wonderful Animals
 

Ridgetop

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Worst mountain liion season was about 25 years ago Several different (identifiable by paw prints) cougars were active in our neighborhood and several more about 15 miles away at western edge of our Valley. They come from surrounding mountains.

First cougar took a couple large dogs a few miles away, then attacked a bicycle rider who managed to fight it off and make it to the highway where he was rescued. Wildlife hunters called in to remove.

Second cougar would lay in rocks on open field next to road to junior high school and watch the kids every afternoon as they left to walk home from school. A few pets disappeared in neighborhood. Wildlife hunters finally came in and removed after complaints fro neighbors about safety of children.

About a year later, our 6-8 month old Shar Pleninetz x Maremma and older Weimaraner drove off a cougar from our property. Neighbor identified it as it escaped through barn corrals where newborn foal was shut in barn with mare. No action taken by Wildlife services.

Twenty years ago our dogs (Pyrs and house dogs) were barking in ravine behind house at night and DS1 came out to investigate. Horses came running past, young cougar rushed out after them followed by dogs. Jumped on top of pasture fence about 10' from DS1 in light from yard lights, paused, and as dogs appeared chasing it escaped over field.

Next sighting was about 12 years ago. High School friend of younger sons was weed whacking field and noticed a large yellow cougar laying in the brush and creeping up on him as he worked. 'He mistakenly thought it was the harmless local bobcat t first, but when it got 15' away and continued to approach he got nervous and revved the weed whacker at it. It ran away through the brush. When it ran he saw the long tail. When he told us of the sighting, we realized it was a cougar.

Over the years lots of larger animals like sheep and goats have been killed and removed. The half eaten carcasses are often found several hundred yards or so away hidden i deeper brush. We had a complete easy access from the Angeles National Forest into our neighborhood. Lots of open land properties covered with brush throughout the neighborhood which give plenty of cover. Fewer livestock animals here than in past years, but plenty of dogs and cats for easy snacking. One of our tagged neighborhood cats (older) died a couple years ago in the Creek fire but his range has since been taken over by another cat.

We seldom see them, but hear the dogs warning them off occasionally. The timbre of their barks makes the hair on the back of your neck literally raise up! There is no mistaking the sound of a dog after a cougar. With several LGDs on guard they rarely come around since the dogs notify everyone in hearing range that a cat is hunting here. They are stealth hunters and having every animal put on notice that they are here makes it harder to get a kill. They usually move on to less guarded and quieter hunting grounds.

If the widlife/predators don't bother us, we accept them and enjoy our occasional sightings. Sadly as the neighborhood gets more built up those sightings become fewer very year.
 

thistlebloom

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Calif. made hunting cougar illegal many years ago. When there is no hunting pressure predators get bolder.

In San Diego's east county where we used to live there were many sightings in the State Park where we rode and hiked. The kids and I saw a huge fresh paw print on a trail on one of our hikes. A woman riding horseback got chased. There was a woman found partially eaten in the brush off the side of a trail, although it was reported that it was not clear if the cougar had killed her or she died on the trail and the cat took advantage. Personally I believe it killed her, but they didn'twant to panic people. And a Boy Scout was dragged from his tent on a campout and killed. Then they have tax payer employed hunters come in to track and kill them . A bit late for some people unfortunately.
 

Ridgetop

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Three women of our riding group a few years saw a cougar walking along a lower trail parallel to them when out on their horses in the mountain park above Capistrano. Luckily the horses did not get a whiff of the cat.

It just goes to show that you have to be aware of any predators that MIGHT be in your area. Just because you don't see them doesn't mean they are not there. They probably are. I don't worry about going outside at night to do whatever chores need doing in the dark because I have 3 large well trained Anatolian LGDs. I am much more cautious if I go out the front door at night onto the road to which my dogs have no access to see what they are upset about. A big cat might be there although probably not. Coyotes often are. I take a flashlight and made sure my access back to the front door is open. LOL While my dogs would probably jump the front 5' wrought iron fence to save me, I prefer to be cautious.

I think it pays to be cautious. If your property has access to open land, expect to have a cougar on your property sooner or later. They don't like barking dogs unless they are hinting them and will retreat from constantly barking LGDs. The resident cougars that show up in our neighborhood usually avoid our property due to the barking dogs. They are not afraid of them, they just don't like the noise they make. If they were little dogs, we might have lost one or two by now, but since they are large the cougars prefer to avoid them. Since there are 3 of them, they really prefer to avoid them.

I wouldn't worry about the cougar. Lock up your goats or sheep at night so the dog can have access all around them. This helps the dog to protect them more easily, and also gives him/her a rest if predators are active during the daytime. Find a second dog if you want one, and you will feel much more comfortable.
 
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