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My Ali is now getting help! updated pictures

Discussion in 'Diseases & Injuries - Goats' started by MaggieSims, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. Sep 3, 2016
    MaggieSims

    MaggieSims Overrun with beasties

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    Hello all! I got this goat bred in winter, and she kidded in January. Her condition was decent, not awesome, but not rescue either. I kept her well fed, and milked her fit several months. I noticed her getting a bit skinny, so i decided to stop milking.
    Overall I have noted several issues I need to address.
    1, she apparently has something going on with her teeth, she is storing half eaten hay in her cheeks like a chipmunk. I asked a vet over the phone, but seemed like they had no idea, she just asked if I looked in there and see anything. But the answer to that is no, I need more help, that goat can be strong and she doesn't want me looking in there with a flashlight. But when I see her cheeks full, I massage her and can feel it dislodge and see hay and take it out.
    2, copper deficiency, really since I got her. But I couldn't find copper bolus anywhere so I got good loose minerals. After she shed winter coat I brushed her and all her black hair on her sides and back fell out. I ordered some ASAP and dosed her August 23rd.

    I'm thinking the combination of the two are causing the thinness issue? Am I overlooking something more obvious?

    Pictures:
    This is her now
    IMG_20160902_124946736.jpg
    Notice the white hair on the one side stayed.
    IMG_20160902_125004122.jpg
     
  2. Sep 3, 2016
    NH homesteader

    NH homesteader Herd Master

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    Have you run a fecal to check for worms? Worms can cause a weight loss, hair and skin issues, and a bloated belly.
     
    mysunwolf and Green Acres Farm like this.
  3. Sep 3, 2016
    Green Acres Farm

    Green Acres Farm True BYH Addict

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    When was the last time she was dewormed? How much are you feeding her? Has she been tested for CAE?
     
  4. Sep 3, 2016
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

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    She's looking a bit "undernourished"... thin/bony... Do you know how old she is? Do you know the quality of the hay you're giving her (tested?)? Have you been supplementing her with grain at all? Now or when you were milking her? She may be getting "enough" (quantity) to eat, but not enough nutrients from it, coupled with mineral deficiency (hair loss) and parasites (thin/hair loss)...

    @Southern by choice @OneFineAcre @babsbag @Goat Whisperer Others?
     
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  5. Sep 3, 2016
    OneFineAcre

    OneFineAcre Herd Master

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    I would agree with everyone else
    Have you checked her for worms?
    What are you feeding
    I have one poorly conditioned goat
    It's one of my bucks
    He has had an issue with worms
     
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  6. Sep 3, 2016
    OneFineAcre

    OneFineAcre Herd Master

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    I do think she is thin
    My rule of thumb is I want to be able to feel a goats ribs but I don't want to see them particularly in a pic
     
  7. Sep 3, 2016
    TAH

    TAH Herd Master

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    What everyone else has said.
     
  8. Sep 3, 2016
    MaggieSims

    MaggieSims Overrun with beasties

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    Honesty, I last wormed in July, buy no fecals done, never had that done , I know I need to but I thought I should be prepared with what to ask the vet for. Do they have different kind of tests, or will they know what I mean? She is the only goat out of 7 that look like this. Her two sons from this year I kept as wethers and look amazing.
     
  9. Sep 3, 2016
    NH homesteader

    NH homesteader Herd Master

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    @Southern by choice has written articles on parasites, if you look them up on here that will get you started!
     
  10. Sep 3, 2016
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

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    Goats chew cud... is this just cud? They will keep cud in their cheek, rechew, and swallow.

    Make sure it isn't just her food - cud-

    Good! How many grams did you give her?

    As far as parasites and fecals-

    Many do deworm their goats 30 days prior to kidding with a dewormer that is safe for pregnant goats. The reason for this is the same hormones that are now kicking in growing those kids and growing those udders are also causing parasites to multiply rapidly. Deworming 30 days before gives the doe a really good start to kidding and lactating.

    Once a doe starts lactation her body is producing milk and needing to also sustain weight etc.
    Many give a dairy goat feed so that sustaining the goat and milking can be acheived without taxing the doe.
    Does, after kidding can have a parasite "bloom" generally 3-6 weeks after. This bloom if not checked and goat isn't dewormed will cause lower production, weight loss, and a myriad of other things.

    Each goat's resistance will be different.

    Fecal analysis is your best method for knowing the "load".
    For example we have one goat never dewormed in 2 years. She had quads then quints never dewormed. Her kids are just shy of 8 months and she now has a load that she needs to be dewormed with. Probably due to lots of rain we have had has caused an increase. We run fecals to monitor and only deworm when necessary.

    Here is more information on FAMACHA (eyelid quick check- NOT to be used alone)
    and Fecal Analysis usinng McMasters Method.
    these are 3 different articles. Good reading and if you still have questions about anything parasite just tag me.

    This explains FAMACHA and FECALS-
    http://www.backyardherds.com/resources/understanding-famacha-fecal-analysis.56/

    This is detailed for the McMasters Method
    PART 1
    http://www.backyardherds.com/resources/the-mcmasters-method-fecal-analysis.55/
    Part 2
    http://www.backyardherds.com/resources/mcmasters-method-fecal-analysis-part2.57/