Navigating a new world in ag.

rittert3

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This might read weird and hard to follow but I'm a broken down sale barn cowboy from the midwest try to get the smallest of homesteads to leave and impression on my 2 kids and 4 steps. I'm not sure if anyone has seen the new investment firms putting private investments into farm equity holdings. I've been all over the animal trading world to learn husbandry methods and markets and I really see the beef market and meat goat market swapping places economically and this is something I beleive in on an ecologically ethical level. I don't beleive in making the bank richer though and feel more secure having an open line of 1 on 1 communication with an operation I'm investing in. So... my question is, is there a way that my family could legitimately invest in fencing loans to convert beef pasture to multi species fence to secure meat goats for the growing market and cash out with a little interest as kids are marketed??
 

Mini Horses

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Of course its possible. Fence would be a.big expense and consideration. But the issue with making $$ is going to be a situation that requires good breeding stock, excellent management and good buyers.

Just like all raised for meat animals, type, size and growth rates must be a consideration when buying breeding stock. If all goes perfect from buy to sell, you might recoup most of your animal costs at first kidding, next kidding could see profits. Not gonna get rich.

With feed expenses unstable, weather in unusual extremes all over the country, it's a hard go. Enough land for good forage and rotation of pastures is critical. Fence? Well that is double cost of last yr and not going to be a recoup any time soon.

That's my input.
 

farmerjan

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Sheep and goats are a faster turn around time with multiple births being a big plus and shorter gestation and inputs per head for the most part. That said there are also some bigger predator concerns... although we have trouble with coyotes here, and have had a few incidents with the cattle... they are pretty bad with lambs and goats... So you are looking at some more involved methods of control that fences alone can't take care of.

It will depend on what type of fencing you have now and what needs replacing/reinforcing. There are several programs through the NRCS for interior cross fencing... for things like fencing out wetlands, and rotational grazing. Go to your extension agent and ask about the programs available. And go on line for your state and find out what is available. We have applied and been accepted in the program here in Va...and although you have to pay for all the work and materials upfront, there is reimbursement money to be had if you qualify and follow the programs requirements.

We run a cow/calf operation and also buy some calves to put together feeders that we market in groups and some we graze at summer pastures. We do alot on rented ground and the fences are not conducive to sheep or goats. We do have a small flock of sheep, they are White Texas Dahl sheep and are raised primarily for the rams "heads and horns" to go on hunting preserves. They are semi-feral and look alot like bighorns. The culls we do sell for meat though. These are kept on one or 2 places where the fences are able to contain them. This spring we lost several lambs to coyotes and had hunters with night scopes come in and got several real big coyotes right after that. We try to run a donkey or mule with most of them, as guardian dogs just do not work for us. We did n ot have any donkeys with the group that we lost the lambs but now have a female there as protection. We have also used llamas and a pair of females did an outstanding job against dogs at one place but we lost the rent when it was sold. They require shearing and such and our sheep are hair sheep.

If the markets continue I think that the lamb and goat kid markets will remain in big demand. If you live on the place where they are and can be good stewards of them, I think that they are a good way to make the farm help be self sufficient.
With the droughts and increased feed prices, cattle are hard to make much money on. But again, it depends on your inputs and how you "play the markets".
 

rittert3

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Well educated about the husbandry needs of various livestock and even exotics like the tx doll. Range bred meat goats in the southern midwest, are what I'm specifically looking at. More specifically a good established herd with someone wanting to graze on beef pasture as the graze different plants and can improve pasture. I just want to put the loan money up to convert fence for someone that cant put out that much upfront. I don't beleive beef alone will sustain these ranches going forward. I'm not looking to invest in a fancy bred boer herd or someone just getting started but someone that really wants to pursue cograzing range bred commercial goats on a larger scale.
 

rittert3

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Fencing will be expensive. How many acres do you have?
0, just looking to get money in the meat goat market for now. The 0 acres and watching the market for the last 15ish years is kind of the reason. If I cant physically own them I want to invest in someone's operation.
 

Baymule

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That might be a little risky. Too many ways to cheat you. It might be better to get a long term lease and raise them yourself.
 
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