Neighbor’s Bull Trying to Visit (& Fencing Help)

LMK17

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Sounds fun if you can keep a good sense of humor about it! I think I'd be a little less jolly in the moment though! 😆

Good on you for handling it so well! :thumbsup
 

farmerjan

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One thing that you will always have to deal with is bulls that don't want to stay home when you have cattle. We have it all the time. The hot wire on top is the best way to go and if it is a plug in fence charger rather than a solar/battery one then that is best.... they will get a good jolt that way. Sometimes they just don't respect fences. But for the most part they will get zapped and get the message if it is a good zap. I would just take a regular electric fence insulator that you nail into a post and run it on the top. There are also the ones that screw in like was mentioned. Yes, he needs to get "hit" as soon as he tries to put his nose/neck/face up to reach over the wire.

I know there are some that would be horrified, but we raised all our various horses in all barbed wire fencing when I was a kid. 3 to 6 strands on most all the pastures/pens. The expensive no climb wire and all is great but expensive. Board fencing is useless for cattle unless it is 5 boards minimum, because they will put their heads inbetween to get at grass, but 3 boards is what you see so many use for horses. All our fencing is woven wire/field fence for the cattle and sheep and would work fine for the horses if they aren't ones to paw at everything. They will try to ride it down though with their feet. But that is mostly always because they are bored, have no grazing available, and just do it because of the boredom.

One of the reasons that there is alot of fall/winter calving, especially in your area is flies. Horn flies can eat up beef cattle and baby calves. There are also the tick problems. Plus, feeder cattle are worth more to sell in the spring. So, if you are going to be raising calves to sell at weaning, it is better to have fall calves, so they will be at the 4-600 lb size in the spring. There is such a glut of lightweight calves to be sold in Sept-Nov, from cows that calve early in the spring and it depresses the prices. And, there is the fact that many farmers/ranchers down that way have to make their hay in the spring/early summer and the fall is more of a down time so they have more time to pay attention to things like calving. Also, it is easier on the cows in the hottest part of the year to not have a calf beside them nursing. She will have good weight and body condition from the good grass in the spring/summer, then be able to take advantage of the little cooler weather and regrowth of some grasses to make the milk. It is easier on cattle to travel the many acres that they need in range conditions when it is cooler in the fall.

One thing that you need to be aware of are your fencing laws there. If you are in a "free range" county (state) then it is your responsibility to fence unwanted animals out. If you do "due dilligence" to do so, then you have grounds to go after someone that their animal has roamed and caused you problems. The best thing is to talk to the neighbor of course... but be aware of your rights too. You can at least make them pay for fixing/repairing/replacing whatever the bull tears up; pay for any damage injuries the bull causes to your animals, pay for vet visit or whatever and lutalyse to abort anything that gets bred that you do not want to get bred if she is in your well fenced field. The land around the outside to keep them off the actual property fence is done here for people that have horses so that they do not have actual contact with other animals and such. It does help some. You can graze other species in those lanes too.
 

Beekissed

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I honestly don’t understand why so many folks around here calve or kid in wintertime. :idunno
I feel the same way. I saw new lambs today in a bitter wind and snow and, as always, wonder why in the world do people do that? Then you get to hear them complaining about losing calves and lambs due to the cold, having to feed the mothers more due to the cold and the calving/lambing, having to bring them into the barn and put them under heat lamps, etc. That can't be profitable, can it?

I know some folks do that so that they can sell offspring for fair club lambs and such, but can't everyone be doing that. I think it's just how their dad did it and his dad did it, etc.

You won't see ruminants being born in the winter out in a wild setting, but I guess folks think they know more than God on how things should go.
 

Ron Bequeath

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I had a cow that walked through a barbed wire fence one time, went 3 miles down the road to find a bull. True love. :gig
A little change but the guy who had this place before me had a sow that hd didn't know was in heat. He went to work one day snd three months three weeks and three days later she blessed him with a litter of the cutest looking piglets you ever saw. What had happened was after he fed her and left, she climbed the pen, walked a mile down the road, climbed in with the boar, when service was complete, she walked home hot back in her pen and was laying in her pen when the fellow got home. Around 120 days later he saw the other farmer who asked him if he had piglets. Of course the answer was yes and at least half looked like dad.
 

LMK17

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One thing that you will always have to deal with is bulls that don't want to stay home when you have cattle. We have it all the time. The hot wire on top is the best way to go and if it is a plug in fence charger rather than a solar/battery one then that is best....

I know there are some that would be horrified, but we raised all our various horses in all barbed wire fencing when I was a kid. 3 to 6 strands on most all the pastures/pens.

One of the reasons that there is alot of fall/winter calving, especially in your area is flies. Horn flies can eat up beef cattle and baby calves. There are also the tick problems. Plus, feeder cattle are worth more to sell in the spring.

One thing that you need to be aware of are your fencing laws there.
Thanks for your thoughts! I figured it had to do with calf sale prices, although I’m with @Beekissed and figure a more natural seasonal approach has got to be in the better interests of the animals. Admittedly, we’ve never calved here, but we have been through a few goat kidding seasons, and they’ve always been just fine regarding the flies and hot conditions in the summer. You are right that summertime can be brutal here, though!

Fortunately, the folks who lived here before us installed a good, strong energizer and a solid fence. We have a plug in energizer. The display on the panel reads 7300 volts, and that fault finder tool tends to read about 9000 volts along the fence line. It’s pretty hot, and all the animals we’ve put behind it (cattle, goats, and hogs) have respected it. Even the big bull next door seems to have gotten the message. He hasn’t bothered to come over. We had houseguests over the weekend, so I didn’t get around to messing with the fence, but it’s certainly a good sign that he‘s stayed on his own side for so long! Still, I’m going to beef it up a bit the first good chance I get.

We are in a fence-in area.
 

farmerjan

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A little change but the guy who had this place before me had a sow that hd didn't know was in heat. He went to work one day snd three months three weeks and three days later she blessed him with a litter of the cutest looking piglets you ever saw. What had happened was after he fed her and left, she climbed the pen, walked a mile down the road, climbed in with the boar, when service was complete, she walked home hot back in her pen and was laying in her pen when the fellow got home. Around 120 days later he saw the other farmer who asked him if he had piglets. Of course the answer was yes and at least half looked like dad.
A friend in Ct had a holstein that would go through, over, or however, any fence there was when she came in heat.,... going looking for a bull. We had to be careful when milking her, because she would follow you down the lane to the barn and try to ride you if you weren't paying attention..... or else she wouldn't be in the field and you would have to travel the neighborhood to find her.... luckily it was still fairly rural, and most places had fields and such of at least a few acres around their houses, but it was a PITB to go to get her and the pasture was empty...
 
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