Neighbor drama with our pigs

Genipher

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We just moved to our new house about 3 weeks ago. I got a permit from our city for our chickens, ducks, goats, and 2 KuneKune pigs. So I'm in accordance with the law in keeping livestock in town.

Tonight I found a letter in our mailbox from "neighbor" (no signed name, but I can guess who it is because we've already had other non-animal complaints from this person).

Note told (didn't ask or request, but basically demanded) we move the 2 pigs to the other side of our property because "the smell makes me sick".
As a PS, there was another demand that I pick up the pig poop.

1. I go on a poop patrol EVERY DAY. On occasion I might miss a day but then I'm out picking up **** again because I don't want it to stink up the neighborhood. If I lived on acreage I'd let it be, but I only have 1/3 an acre so I've been keeping on top of it. Did a poop patrol at our last house (which was also in town), too.

2. Can't move the pigs across the yard. The layout just doesn't work.

The neighbor can easily see into our yard. It's a chain link fence. Lay of the land goes: our yard, chain fence, a big driveway/road, and then the neighbors across the street. Legally, there is enough distance between our livestock and the neighbors.

The problem is City Ordinance says if a neighbor complains about noise or smell, I may be forced to get rid of the pigs.

What would y'all do? Bathe the pigs every day? Train the pigs to poo in a toilet outside? Leave a flaming pile of pig poo on the neighbors porch? (Okay, I would never stoop so low).
My husband doesn't want to move them. He and our son just put a lot of time and energy into fencing an area for them. And if we DID move them they'd be closer to our rear neighbors, which would legally put them too close!
Sell the porkers? I had been considering finding them new homes before this complaint but it could be awhile before I get a taker.

This was my big worry about staying in town with livestock. All it takes is ONE complaining neighbor...they can even flat-out LIE about my animals stinking, and I could lose them. If I move the pigs or sell them, what's to stop this nosey neighbor from complaining about my chickens or goats next?

I hate this.

Any advice??
 

Mini Horses

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Even picking up every day, they have their own aroma. 😁

You need something to treat the ground, not hurt the pigs. Maybe a natural enzyme like used for dogs?

Hopefully another has better ideas. But yes, complaints on pigs may cause loss of goats and chickens. Consider this ... Some or none.
 

Alasgun

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Not picking here; just being realistic! That seem’s like a lot of livestock on 1/3 acre. Put yourself in the “complainers shoes”, some folks just aren’t as into animals as you seem to be.
you mention “just moved to our new house”; why didn’t you locate to a more rural area?
surely you realize, you can throw a rock across a 1/3 of an acre? In my mind that’s way to small for even chickens and goats, let alone pigs; unless that parcel is remote Which it doesn’t sound like.

When we we’re on the ranch (33 sections) we did as we please today im on 1.5 acres in a subdivision and fret over my 4 rabbits which are housed in near laboratory conditions; out of concerns for the neighbors, non of which are complainers. AND i intend to keep it that way.
 

Genipher

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Even picking up every day, they have their own aroma. 😁

You need something to treat the ground, not hurt the pigs. Maybe a natural enzyme like used for dogs?

Hopefully another has better ideas. But yes, complaints on pigs may cause loss of goats and chickens. Consider this ... Some or none.

True. I've noticed they have a sort of "musky" scent. Though I generally can't smell it unless I get close to them. Like, in their pen. Which makes me wonder if "neighbor" came up to the fence, took a big whiff and thought, "Too stinky!!"

At any rate, I moved them out of their enclosure and am letting them free range the yard, away from eyesight of the driveway/road until I can decide what to do.

And I need to go talk to the neighbor, if she'll talk. Last time she had an issue I was asleep and so she talked to my visiting sister-in-law, but first made it clear she "didn't have her hearing aid in". So she seems the type to want to do all the talking and not listen...
 

Genipher

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Not picking here; just being realistic! That seem’s like a lot of livestock on 1/3 acre. Put yourself in the “complainers shoes”, some folks just aren’t as into animals as you seem to be.
you mention “just moved to our new house”; why didn’t you locate to a more rural area?
surely you realize, you can throw a rock across a 1/3 of an acre? In my mind that’s way to small for even chickens and goats, let alone pigs; unless that parcel is remote Which it doesn’t sound like.

When we we’re on the ranch (33 sections) we did as we please today im on 1.5 acres in a subdivision and fret over my 4 rabbits which are housed in near laboratory conditions; out of concerns for the neighbors, non of which are complainers. AND i intend to keep it that way.

We tried to find land. Put an offer on a 22 acre place with a house but got outbid.
Put an offer on 12 acres of beautiful wooded land with a small house and got outbid by a cash buyer.
Acreage was either too far away for my husband to drive to work, too expensive for our budget, or got snatched by cash buyers. :hit

Eventually, we ran out of time (our house had sold and we had 90 days to find a place). Found this large lot with a house big enough to hold our 8 kids. We came from 1/4 lot so it's a HUGE upgrade for us. Though our last place, we basically only had ONE neighbor and she loved all our animals. So it's hard to go from an awesome, supportive neighbor to a neighbor who is showing herself to be a controlling nitpicker. (And she's not just complaining about our animals. She had "words to say" about me putting out bottles to recycle instead of cashing them in. sigh.)

Plenty of room for our 2 Nigerian Dwarf goats, chicken, and 2 ducks. The ducks have a bit of smell (I'm actually trying to sell them right now because they aren't being very productive in hatching out ducklings) but otherwise, there is no stink (from them, specifically...the pigs have an odor but you've gotta get pretty close to smell them).
The pigs have been fine in their penned area. And the city didn't think we had too much...completely legal on our end.
Sorry if I sound defensive.

This was NOT the house I wanted. I wanted country. I wanted a couple of acres. But we don't always get what we want so I'm trying to work with what I have.

I agree, though, that I probably need to downgrade. Thinking of just keeping the chickens and goats. That way we have meat, eggs, and milk.
 
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Alasgun

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Lot’s of folks “moving to the country” these days which i applaud but most have no experience in animal husbandry or gardening. learn as you go works pretty well as long as you are adaptable and can afford the learning curve.
Along the way most gain experience; which is what you get when you don’t get what you want!
We pay $8.00 a dozen for eggs that are non gmo, organic, pasture raised etc. and don’t mind! We fully understand what go’s into producing those eggs and are happy to not have to keep the water from freezing in the winter, keep the bull snakes out of the nest in the summer, keeping the coop clean, watching out for predators, running them out of the garden, butchering them etc, may as well be milking cows because you will be tied down 24/7.

There’s a high price to pay for small producers and it’s even higher if you cant generate some of the necessary inputs. And you notice, i’ve not mentioned your labor! If you factor that in, you lose every-time. This is purely a labor of love Which wears thin for most after a period of time.
 

Genipher

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Lot’s of folks “moving to the country” these days which i applaud but most have no experience in animal husbandry or gardening. learn as you go works pretty well as long as you are adaptable and can afford the learning curve.
Along the way most gain experience; which is what you get when you don’t get what you want!
We pay $8.00 a dozen for eggs that are non gmo, organic, pasture raised etc. and don’t mind! We fully understand what go’s into producing those eggs and are happy to not have to keep the water from freezing in the winter, keep the bull snakes out of the nest in the summer, keeping the coop clean, watching out for predators, running them out of the garden, butchering them etc, may as well be milking cows because you will be tied down 24/7.

There’s a high price to pay for small producers and it’s even higher if you cant generate some of the necessary inputs. And you notice, i’ve not mentioned your labor! If you factor that in, you lose every-time. This is purely a labor of love Which wears thin for most after a period of time.
Very true. I've been feeling a bit overwhelmed since we moved. Maybe if things get organized, it'll get better.

I'm not expecting to make money off our animals but if push comes to shove, I'm hoping they'll help feed us. Learned how quickly the store shelves empty when Covid hit last year...
 

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I would learn as much as you can about the animal code enforcement people for your town. Are they okay as long as you follow exact letter of rules, anything goes, or hate that code "technically" allows livestock in "their" town?

If issue is general "smell" of non-dog/cat critter vs true odors, maybe plant some VERY fragrant plants along fenceline? It would take some place from pen. I would use tall plants like lilacs, roses, climbing vine flower. Out of sight and smell makes good neighbors?
 

Genipher

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I would learn as much as you can about the animal code enforcement people for your town. Are they okay as long as you follow exact letter of rules, anything goes, or hate that code "technically" allows livestock in "their" town?

If issue is general "smell" of non-dog/cat critter vs true odors, maybe plant some VERY fragrant plants along fenceline? It would take some place from pen. I would use tall plants like lilacs, roses, climbing vine flower. Out of sight and smell makes good neighbors?
I was thinking of planting a privacy hedge a few days ago. Having something that smells good like lilacs would be nice.
Might put up a privacy fence, too.
 

secuono

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Hogs have a very similar stench as people have, the BO & the poop. You can potty train pigs, not all of them, not easily, but you can.
You might have to bribe the neighbors to keep the peace. With chicken meat or eggs.
 

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