MaryZoe

Chillin' with the herd
Joined
Feb 18, 2017
Messages
25
Reaction score
6
Points
29
Hello,

My husband and I are taking the hike from south to north Florida (no mean feat in such a long state!) in a couple of weeks to pick up our Southdown Babydoll Sheep (brother and sister, 8 weeks old). We presently have 2 goats, 2 Akbash dogs, 2 cats, 3 tortoises, 3 donkeys, and 40+ chickens. All our critters are beautifully integrated and incredibly tame at the moment (well...the dogs are not trustworthy with the chickens). So what is the best way to introduce the baby sheep? Would some meeting time through a fence be helpful, or can I simply introduce the lambs to the mixture and expect them to fit into the "herd"? And what is the best way to try to assure that the lambs are as bonded with us as all the rest? We got the goats when they were a day old, one donkey when it was 4-5 months old, and one donkey was born here. Even our Akbash are completely socialized and love being around us. Hints for raising friendly sheep?

Many Thanks for any ideas or suggestions.

Warmly,
MaryZoe
 

Baymule

Herd Master
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
23,726
Reaction score
60,392
Points
823
Location
Northeast Texas
Since you are getting brother and sister, and they are going to be pets, I suppose you are having the ram lamb wethered? I think you will be well pleased with sheep. Put them in a pen to themselves to start with and let them get to know you. Sit on a bucket or something and just let them get used to you. Then you can start offering them feed, move the feeder closer to you, offer some in your hand.

Let them get acquainted through the fence, then turn them out. I call my sheep with a high pitched SHEEP! SHEEP! SHEEP! and they start blathering and yelling at me. They will follow me anywhere if I have a coffee can of feed. LOL
 

Sheepshape

Herd Master
Joined
Oct 19, 2012
Messages
1,706
Reaction score
3,066
Points
373
Baymule has nailed it.

Sheep just want you in their flock, but are inherently a prey species, so need to have a gentle introduction. Pen them securely within the rest of your flock/herd/collection/gathering and get them used to the other animals in the vicinity and used to treats/cuddles/sights and smells etc from yourselves. Introduce them to the other animals slowly.....I don't think you'll find a problem.

I have dogs, cats, sheep , chickens....oh and a human family, and they all mill around and play together. Chickens have been broody in the dog bed (which he shares with one of the cats), and dog has been accidentally locked in with newborn lambs on a number of occasions etc.....I never worry.

Sheep can be very affectionate and are WAY more intelligent than some folk credit them with being. they want to be loved (and a good many of us want to love them)

Good Luck
 
Top