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jesuslover48

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So excited to be getting my first fainting goat! Can you give me some advice on feeding? Have been reading on feeding, and am wondering about if I should give him grain or not? And if so, what would be the best for him? He will have plenty of grazing area, salt and mineral block and hay. Is there anything that I am missing?
 

Alaskan

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So excited to be getting my first fainting goat! Can you give me some advice on feeding? Have been reading on feeding, and am wondering about if I should give him grain or not? And if so, what would be the best for him? He will have plenty of grazing area, salt and mineral block and hay. Is there anything that I am missing?
Loose minerals are way better for goats than a mineral block. You can leave the block out as a fun boredom buster... but for enough minerals he needs loose minerals in a free feeder.

Also, search and see if your area of the world is low in selenium and/or copper. If yes, he needs those supplemented in addition to the loose minerals.

If you are above... maybe latitude 50, I would also think about supplemental vitamin D.

Hay should be good clean grass hay (timothy, orchard, coastal... whatever is in your area) and put in a feeder so it stays clean and dry and he doesn't waste it all.

By "him" is he a full grown wether? If full grown, and castrated.... then no, he doesn't need grain. If he is still growing then a little grain is good.

If he is done growing, I would do a handful of "something" at night only for training, keeping him tame, and to help lock him up for the night. So, a small handful of maintenance goat pellets would probably be the best choice.
 

TheGoatLife

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Loose minerals are way better for goats than a mineral block. You can leave the block out as a fun boredom buster... but for enough minerals he needs loose minerals in a free feeder.

Also, search and see if your area of the world is low in selenium and/or copper. If yes, he needs those supplemented in addition to the loose minerals.

If you are above... maybe latitude 50, I would also think about supplemental vitamin D.

Hay should be good clean grass hay (timothy, orchard, coastal... whatever is in your area) and put in a feeder so it stays clean and dry and he doesn't waste it all.

By "him" is he a full grown wether? If full grown, and castrated.... then no, he doesn't need grain. If he is still growing then a little grain is good.

If he is done growing, I would do a handful of "something" at night only for training, keeping him tame, and to help lock him up for the night. So, a small handful of maintenance goat pellets would probably be the best choice.
Since does are less likely to get UC, they can have grain in the mornings?
Would it be alright to feed a cup of grain in the morning regardless of age and gender?

Hay wise, is an orchard and alfalfa mix alright?
 

farmerjan

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If you are doing an alfalfa mix with orchard grass, then grain is really not necessary unless you are milking ..... the alfalfa will provide the extra protein... you do not want them getting too fat or too much protein... it can make their hooves grow very fast and can cause founder. If they have pasture with all the rest, grain should only be a treat and a training tool to get them to come when called to put in a catch pen or barn or whatever.... Too much of a good thing will make them fat and will cause problems.
 

Alaskan

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Since does are less likely to get UC, they can have grain in the mornings?
Would it be alright to feed a cup of grain in the morning regardless of age and gender?

Hay wise, is an orchard and alfalfa mix alright?

As @farmerjan said... you want her to be a good weight. Too fat is bad, and too skinny is bad.

Milk breeds look thinner than meat breeds since they have less muscle. So it is best to get familiar with the ideal weight for the breed that you have.
 

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