Niacin question on ducks and waterfowl?

Nao57

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So I was reading that swans for certain types may only have their flight feathers during certain parts of the year. They'll grow them only for migrations and then might lose them. But they also will still be able to fly for many non-migratory breeds, though for shorter flights.

And mallards fly.

Geese fly.

But domestic ducks don't fly.

...

Isn't that curious.

I wondered if the role of niacin and eating algae affects the length and structure of their flight feathers? (Which would affect flying skills...) Not to mention when you look at swans their feathers do seem to sometimes be able to fly and sometimes not fly as well. And they do feed on lots of algae...isn't that interesting. (Yes I know they aren't ducks. But they aren't too far different in genetics.)

What do you think about this idea, regarding flight feathers growth link with niacin?

Most people at home raising waterfowl won't and don't have algae to feed them all the time....

So this has me thinking there might be a link there.

(But I get that my fat pekings probably wouldn't really fly, haha. They are too fat and big.)(But my other ducks aren't fat. )

It also just so happens that people treat angel wing syndrome with niacin.

But what if there's more to it, what if people fed their domestic ducks algae all the time? Would those ducks then be able to fly? (except for fat pekings haha.)
 

chickens really

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No connection to niacin and algae in regards to if a bird can fly or not. Ducks, Geese etc go through eclipse and that impeds the ability to fly. Molt is a natural thing and birds lose and regrow feathers twice a year.
niacin will not cure angel wing.
Breeding domestic ducks for production has changed the confirmation of certain breeds so no they can not fly.
 

Beekissed

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Yep...usually genetics more than nutrition, as many, many domestic ducks have access to farm ponds and algae all their lives.

When I was young we were visited by a Canadian goose(back when they were protected)and its companion, a Pekin duck. We lived along the river and it was winter time. That duck flew as well as the goose and many domestic ducks and breeds still can fly well and must be pinioned or they will take off with wild groups, but mostly have been bred towards domesticity.
 

messybun

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Interesting thought there, and I do not mean to disagree with a questioning mind, but I don’t believe so. I know many domestic ducks who live in algae laden ponds and their flight depends on their breed. As far as vit b, algae actually contains a fair amount of it. Algae also has a great deal of other nutrients that will help feathers grow well; I know that some people even supplement algae flakes.
Domestic animals have been bred so they don’t fly as well as their wild counter parts.
Now, for angel wing, that is caused by the flight feathers growing. Because when feathers are growing in they are filled with blood sometimes a young Duck’s wrist will flip out because of the weight. Then the wrist will harden and be stuck that way. Ducks do need more niacin, and if a bird is deprived I guess I could see the link of them being weaker when it comes to holding feathers up. But I’m afraid there is no cure for it.
 

Spokeless Wheel

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I have Muscovys that love to fly. I love watching them fly except on the rare occasion they fly into me coming into the barn for the night. lol It's a beautiful sight watching groups of them fly around my property.
 

Nao57

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I have Muscovys that love to fly. I love watching them fly except on the rare occasion they fly into me coming into the barn for the night. lol It's a beautiful sight watching groups of them fly around my property.
And they always come back? They never try to find something else?

Curious what you might say about this.

It sounds fun what you described.
 

Spokeless Wheel

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As soon as they hatch I take them from the mom and raise them. I've lost too many leaving them with the mom. So they know the barn is a safe place and I give a scoop of feed when they come in. Never had any fly off on their own.
 

Misty13

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They have no reason to leave. They have food, water, shelter, why would they want to go else where?
And they always come back? They never try to find something else?

Curious what you might say about this.

It sounds fun what you described.
 
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