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Pet ducks with wild ducks?

Discussion in 'Other Animals' started by MaggieSims, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. Sep 3, 2016
    MaggieSims

    MaggieSims Overrun with beasties

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    I have two Welsh Harlequin ducks, a male and female pair, and recently acquired 2 'wild' mallards. They first found our pond, and loved it. Hung out every day, this pond is about 500 yards from the house, is by the road, but not a busy road. Anyway, one night they decided to waddle up and check us out. I, at the time, had my duckies in a closed area, in the back. The wild ducks hung out in the front foraging, then flew to the pond. So for a few days the walked up the driveway randomly. Finally they found my ducks, and at first were pushy, and mine were push overs. My kids would go chase off the wild ones and they would fly to the pond, but a few hours later they waddle back up. So now, after all this, they are getting more used to us and no longer push mine around.
    IMG_20160902_124200288.jpg
     
  2. Sep 3, 2016
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

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    Lots of folks and of course the govt are concerned about avian flu and having wild ducks (and other birds) that migrate all over the place, mix with your domesticated ducks (and other birds), which obviously don't move around. It's touted as a recipe for disaster. Many folks try as best they can to keep the two from intermingling... :\ I've actually read of folks "netting" their small duck ponds to keep wild ducks and geese out.

    Though I can understand the thought behind it, I don't really see it as a realistic option. :( I mean those wild mallards have been all over the place just around your property, and other wild birds have been in those same places, so short of locking your birds in a glass bubble, if there's disease present in the area, your birds will be exposed to it, one way or another. It's kinda how nature works, and only the strong will survive... Adapt or die... that sorta thing. Of course those that are worried aren't so much about the lives of the birds as that of the humans who happen to be able to catch this flu from the birds who are infected. :confused: :hu
     
  3. Sep 3, 2016
    MaggieSims

    MaggieSims Overrun with beasties

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    Is there something I can do for the wild ones, or mine for that matter, that will protect or vaccinate? They like the feed, should I add any medication? When I was buying my ducklings, they had mallards, and the lady advised them to always be fully contained, or they will fly and be wild, maybe that's the story here? They could be caught if I need to medicate.
     
  4. Sep 3, 2016
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

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    IMHO, there isn't much if anything you can do really... :hu As with most "wild" animals, as long as you're willing to provide food, they're not going anywhere. That's been a huge issue with all the huge populations of Canada geese... They've become "localized" and don't migrate anymore because there's enough food for them to stay in one spot year round, much to the chagrin of many businesses and golf courses that "try" to maintain pristine lawns... The geese are grazers, and all that lush greenery keeps them where they are.

    Edit to correct "wind" to "wild".
     
    Last edited: Sep 3, 2016
  5. Sep 3, 2016
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

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  6. Sep 3, 2016
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    @Southern by choice really isn't a heartless as she seems. ;)

    I personally would take my chances with them, they are already in your yard. I have wild birds at all of feeders and my chickens are at my wild bird feeders too. There are some things I just can't get too stressed about, and wild birds mingling with my chickens is one of them. Not that I don't see the potential problem, but I just don't see a viable solution so I live and let live.
     
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  7. Sep 3, 2016
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

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    :lol::lol::lol:
    I love me some duck! :drool Not heartless, just I know what good eatin' is. :p

    Babs is right, sometimes there isn't alot you can do.

    AI is not the only issue.
    There are a whole lot of other waterfowl, and poultry diseases that wild birds bring in.

    We have guardian dogs so our birds are pretty protected. Wild birds do not come in anymore.

    The issue with the ducks is this- if they do eventually move off when they return they will bring more and so on and so on. For some it ends up a nightmare situation. If you want to keep them then clip one wing and they can be an addition without them migrating and bringing all their friends next year.

    Check with your state laws though. Some states restrict Mallards and it is illegal to keep them unless you have a specific permit.
     
    micah wotring likes this.
  8. Sep 3, 2016
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    Funny, we can't keep mallards but they can keep us...go figure. So do I get in trouble for them landing in my yard? Don't you think is should be the duck breaking the law and not me? :lol:
     
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