Planning our pasture... soggy area in woods OK?

seachick

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Hello,

We live on a small <1 acre lot in the suburbs and are getting 2 Nigerian Dwarf does. We plan to fence in a part of our grassy lawn that is about 1000 square feet for them, but it has no shrubs or trees. We DO have a big chunk of wooded area that we could fence, but it's pretty soggy. In the springtime it's basically ALL wet and sloshy, and in summer it dries out but not completely. One area has cattails growing in it, for example.

I understand that wetness is bad for goat hooves. What do you guys think? Fence in another 1000 sf of this wooded zone, or just stick with the 1000 sf grassy area?

Thanks!
Stacey
 

B&B Happy goats

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Not knowing what state you are living in, my answer would be, do you have snakes, gators, wild pigs ?...what lives in the damp sometimes soggy area and what grows that is of benefit to the goats ?
 

seachick

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Not knowing what state you are living in, my answer would be, do you have snakes, gators, wild pigs ?...what lives in the damp sometimes soggy area and what grows that is of benefit to the goats ?
I'm in southern Maine, so no snakes, gators or wild pigs here :) It's also a very small area: the back yards of the surrounding homes dip into this wet wooded spot, the whole area is probably about 1 acre and about 1/4 of that is on our land.

It's filled with low skinny maple saplings and shrubby stuff like Japanese knotweed, jewelweed, honeysuckle: I think the goats would love to browse there. The grassy 1000 sf paddock we'll have has no shrubs or woody plants to browse on.

Thanks!
 

seachick

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So you guys don't think the fact that it is very very squishy wet in springtime (like my boots sink 6" in!), and moderately so all year, will be a problem? I keep reading about hoof rot from wet pastures. Is that only a concern if there's no place dry to get to?
 

frustratedearthmother

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So you guys don't think the fact that it is very very squishy wet in springtime (like my boots sink 6" in!), and moderately so all year, will be a problem? I keep reading about hoof rot from wet pastures. Is that only a concern if there's no place dry to get to?
Goats don't generally enjoy wet areas - but will go there to browse. It would be better if they can come and go as they please. Remember also that parasites can flourish in damp areas. Not sure if that's a problem in your area but something to keep in mind if that's a concern.
 

greybeard

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I've always felt that a person's entire property should be fenced at the perimeter no matter what. It helps to ensure containment, decreases predator and uninvited 'people' incursion, and keeps property lines visible for the life of the property.
Cross fence as needed, and the more you have the better it is.
We aren't talking about huge acreage here so the initial expense and labor will be minimal, with years of return on investment.
I've built a lot of fences and cross fences..all are permanent. I don't build temporary anything. If I need it once, I'll likely need it again later. Labor and time are your biggest enemy...not money.

fencegates.jpg
 
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