Possible Goat sickness/emergency please I need some insight

Ebonythehorse

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what else should I put in the kit? Im thinking a heat lamp, a hairdryer, towels, gloves, and probably some bottles and things for bottle babies. I know if I leave the kids on the does they can pass something to the kids although I dont remember exactly what its called. The does I have also have never had a kid stay with them and nurse off them, so I'm a bit nervous even if I were to decide to try leaving them. They came from a state farm actually and are registered and all that. I think we have the info on the buck they were bred to as well. I heard something about milking the doe, somehow heat treating the milk and feeding it back to the kid. Do you know how that works and what I'll need? I need to do a lot of research but my lifes is a tad bit insane right now
 

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I know if I leave the kids on the does they can pass something to the kids

I heard something about milking the doe, somehow heat treating the milk and feeding it back to the kid
That sounds as if they are positive for CAE??

:th

Well.... figure that out first, and decide how you want to go from there.

IF the does are FREE of disease, then it is a great and wonderful thing for them to nurse their kids directly. Then the kids learn to be goats, you have way less work, and the kids get many powerful and helpful antibodies from the does.

Also, from HEALTHY does, it is perfectly safe for humans to drink raw milk (so not heat treating the milk). Raw milk has many more health benefits.
 

Ebonythehorse

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That sounds as if they are positive for CAE??

:th

Well.... figure that out first, and decide how you want to go from there.

IF the does are FREE of disease, then it is a great and wonderful thing for them to nurse their kids directly. Then the kids learn to be goats, you have way less work, and the kids get many powerful and helpful antibodies from the does.

Also, from HEALTHY does, it is perfectly safe for humans to drink raw milk (so not heat treating the milk). Raw milk has many more health benefits.
oh no i do not believe they are positive for it, I dont exactly know why they had taken them off the does I was sort of confused.
 

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what else should I put in the kit? Im thinking a heat lamp, a hairdryer, towels, gloves, and probably some bottles and things for bottle babies.
Yes, I have a goat puller, it was inexpensive, and i have never needed it! But I have always been happy that I owned it.

I like a heating pad that can stay always on. I duct tape the heating pad into a heavy duty ziplock. The ziplock makes for easier cleaning. You can get dog kennel heating pads that are sturdy, but human ones work too, except most now have an automatic shutoff.

Heatlamp only with strong and sturdy attachments so goats can NOT knock it down.

Hairdryer is good.

Trashbags that are good and sturdy (put kid in trashbag with head out, rest of kid in bag, hold kid in hot water, kitchen sink is usually easiest. This is the fastest and ssfest way to warm up a cold kid. Since the kid doesnt get wet, it works best. If the kid got wet then the kid would chill when removed from the water. The trashbag keeps the kid dry.)

Towels

2 lap blankets made from a good quality synthetic so they are warm when wet and easy to wash. Good if you need to hide the heatpad when making a heat box/ warm place to bed down... if it is horrid nssty when the kids come. .... or they are small/problematic/need extra help.

Duct tape, vet wrap

Stack of clean feed bags to lay down tarp like for a clean kidding and working area

A bottle of good quality lubricant if you have to reach in.

The cord SHOULD break on its own, but something to cut the cord if needed.

Disinfectant or lighter to sterilize whatever you use to cut.

Disinfectant to dip the end of the kid's cord. Ususlly easiest if this disinfectant is in a pill bottle or similar, to make it less fiddly to use.

Paste of a B complex and a probiotics paste if kids or doe go off their feed

Colostrum paste, to give a problem kid an extra boost

Stuff to prevent milk problems... so extra calcium for doe before kidding (there are powders and supplements, different choices), you can also get a calcium/magnesium paste

Also... if there are mineral deficiencies in your area.. selenium shots might need to be given during pregancy.... there are selenium pastes... but not as much is absorbed with those, need to do those about once a month... also make sure copper isnt deficient in your area.

I always got fancy trace mineral kelp meal for the does for 4 weeks or so before kidding...

A milk stanchion. If the doe doesnt want the kids to nurse, you can lock her in it so the kids have an easier time nursing. You will want one for later anyway, when you milk. You need a way to feed her while she is milked/on the milk stanchion

I never heat treated milk... I also never bottle fed.... i did have a couple bottles on hand just in case.


To milk:
I would rub off all hay and filth from the doe, rub her udder gently (NO washing or whatever), first 2 squirts on the ground, then milk into a metal pot or pail. Bring it into the house, pour the fresh milk through a filter and into a glass jar, then into the fridge. I tried to use cheese cloth to filter the milk, but it is DIFFICULT to fully wash out the milk smell... so switched to disposable milk filters that perfectly fit into a large metal funnel that perfectly fit on top of my glass jars.

You should buy the milking stuff at the same time... save on shipping

Also... do you have whatever you want for hoof trims? Castration? Dehorning?
 
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