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Post needed and spacing

Discussion in 'Fencing, Housing, Manure Management' started by Goathead, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. Feb 8, 2019
    Goathead

    Goathead Exploring the pasture

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    I've been searching but can't seem to find what I'm looking for and apologize if this has been asked already.

    I'm going to be fencing an area of about 6,400 square feet for 2-3 nigerian dwarf goats, the longest run will be 150ft and I'm wondering what the best post spacing would be and do I need to have wood posts between the T-post? I know I need wood post for all corners, just not 100% sure on the straight runs. I have read so many different ways to do it from spacing wood post up to 50 feet apart with T-post every 10 to 12 feet apart between the wood posts. I have also read that I only need wood post for the corners and only T-post 12 feet apart for the straight runs.
    Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Feb 8, 2019
    Devonviolet

    Devonviolet Herd Master

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    First, I want to welcome you to BYH @Goathead. :frow Please add a your location (at least closest city) to your profile. Also, a bit about yourself and your animals. And, oh by the way, we LOVE photo! Especially of cute animals.

    Now, as to your questions. The basics are people usually do 6 or 8 foot spacing between t—posts. Every 100 or so feet needs minimum a 6” wood post. An h-post is better than a single post. However, for your 150' span you might want to split the difference and put an h-post at 75'.


    Some people put their posts in 24-36’. We always put ours in 3 feet. Pressure treated posts are recommended, but if you have cedar on your property, like we do, sealing the end of the post, with a black sealer is a good idea. We have clay, which holds the water, in fact we often have standing water in our holes, as we dig them. So, if you do, even sealing pressure treated posts is preferred. Ask me how I know. :th

    For wire, don’t waste your time or money using the cheaper welded wire. Four foot, no climb, woven horse fencing is best. The goats (even NDs) will break the welds in no time. Again, ask me how I know. That’s all the previous owners, of our property, used. :th

    Again, you are wasting your time or money if you don’t use “H-posts”. There are some excellent posts about putting in h-posts. It’s too complex, for me to explain in a few words here. You will get some excellent information at the links below:

    Field fencing and goats

    Here is another one:

    Some fencing tips

    When you are finished watching the video, there are quite a few good posts here:

    Here is a link to the list of fencing forums. You’ll notice that your question is number one.

    https://www.backyardherds.com/search/7110040/?q=Fencing,+h-posts&t=post&o=date
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
    Goathead and B&B Happy goats like this.
  3. Feb 8, 2019
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

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    Post spacing is usually dependent on how soft the ground is 1-2' down, how far you drive the tee posts, and whether you have any other out side pressure on the fence. (usually flowing water)
    If you are wanting to keep from installing a lot of extra posts, use a good HT woven/knotted wire and stretch it TIGHT. (It should stand up on it's on as you put the tension on it, have zero 'waviness' along the top line of it)

    Any part of a post sticking up more than a couple inches above the top wire of a finished fence is wasted post....the air and wind don't need the support. Put them in as deep as you can.
     
    Goathead and CntryBoy777 like this.
  4. Feb 9, 2019
    Rammy

    Rammy Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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  5. Feb 9, 2019
    Goathead

    Goathead Exploring the pasture

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    @Devonviolet and @greybeard, thank you for your input, all that info is very helpful! Now it's time to sit down and redraw my fencing layout.
     
    Devonviolet likes this.