Problems with a Lesson Pony

Baymule

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I never bought an insurance policy on a horse, so no help to you there.

I've had horses in barb wire. They managed to find ways to cut themselves, hurt themselves on other things they found besides the wire. One time my mare came limping up with a big upholstery tack in her foot! Where did THAT come from????? Horror stories abound about barbed wire, I've used it practically all my life. I would use it again and I use it now.

Once we used field fence and the horses pawed it, tore it up and didn't hurt themselves on the wire. The field fence was crap-big mistake.

We have this place fenced in 2"x4"x48" non climb horse wire with barbed wire at the top. I want the barbed wire at the top to keep them off the fence.

If you have hot wire, that should keep the horses away from the fence. Add the poly wire if it gives you peace of mind.
 

thistlebloom

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Those prices sound reasonable to me, and what I would expect in my area for horses like those. Have you made a decision yet?

I think your fencing situation sounds fine. As to insurance, I have never insured a horse either.
 

promiseacres

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Horses sound like good options. Be aware the pony may behave better for the kids than for an adult, you may lose him sooner than you think. My haflinger Richie is like that. :idunno
Fence sounds fine. You may want a dry lot area for the pony for times when the grass is fast growing, spring in particular as ponies can founder on grass.
As for insurance, what is your goal? To cover medical emergency or liability. We have a farm/livestock liability policy if our horses escape and damage someone's property. But I think a horse related emergency savings account would be better than mortality or colic insurance that has stipulations, especially for "pleasure" horses.
 

LMK17

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Those prices sound reasonable to me, and what I would expect in my area for horses like those. Have you made a decision yet?
We have! We’ll bring the horses home after our final lesson before the barn closes on the 31! 😍 I‘d normally insist on a pre-purchase exam. As it is, I have a vet appt for them for a few days after we bring them home. I’ve asked the seller to agree to take them back if the vet finds anything serious, but as we’ve ridden them multiple times, they’re still working as lesson horses, and we have seen them over several weeks (and trust the owner), I have no real concerns. I’m very hopeful that we’ll be able to continue learning with our current instructor + these horses, and the owner has also volunteered to help with any questions I might have going forward. All in all, I think it’s just about the best possible way to get started with horses of our own— They’re good, steady lesson horses, and we have the seller + trainer for ongoing support. Crazy to think that two months ago we were looking for a new barn and definitely did not have plans to purchases horses of our own, and now here we are. 🤷‍♀️ How’s that for timing! 🤣

As for insurance, what is your goal? To cover medical emergency or liability. We have a farm/livestock liability policy if our horses escape and damage someone's property. But I think a horse related emergency savings account would be better than mortality or colic insurance that has stipulations, especially for "pleasure" horses.
My goal was to cover medical emergencies. Looking into it, I’m not sure I could get any kind of insurance on the older guy, and I agree that probably just saving for emergencies is the better way to go. Thanks!
 
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