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Profitability with raising, breeding, and milking Nigerian Dwarf goats?

Discussion in 'Organic Husbandry - Goats' started by Finge, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. Dec 13, 2016
    Goat Whisperer

    Goat Whisperer Herd Master

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    I agree with @Fullhousefarm ! Great post.

    Look up insurance for selling soaps/lotion. It's a product that is put on the skin and you can get sued…
    We looked at the cost of insurance and it wasn't a financially smart move.
     
  2. Dec 13, 2016
    Finge

    Finge Chillin' with the herd

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    Where im at there's no breeding license needed to breed dogs if we have a small number of dogs, which is 3, we have 3 breeding females, and don't plan on getting anymore, or at least im content with my one loyal dog. and in the town we live in, we don't have grocery stores, we have a general store and that's it for getting food, or they have to drive 30 miles to the 'city' which is my old town to go to a Walmart that basically no one likes to go to. So, if I do start up a small market just on selling veggies, I could easily get away with it and make some good money.
     
    CntryBoy777 likes this.
  3. Dec 13, 2016
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

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    https://www.soapguild.org

    $520.00 a year. I don't have insurance for soap and lotion but you can bet that I will have it for the dairy and it will be a lot more than that.

    Even with a licensed Grade A dairy I wouldn't want to have to try and live off of the income. If I can get my goats to pay for themselves that will be good enough for me.
     
    NH homesteader and samssimonsays like this.
  4. Dec 14, 2016
    NH homesteader

    NH homesteader Herd Master

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    Glad you posted @babsbag, I was going to tag you!
     
  5. Dec 14, 2016
    Fullhousefarm

    Fullhousefarm Loving the herd life

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    Definitely look at your market.

    I was getting 2 gallons of milk a day (after feeding 3 bottle babies from another farm) and sold out almost constantly from January-April this year. We sell for pet consumption and it was actually mostly for pets. ;) All it takes is a few customers that end up with orphan/bottle lambs or goats and that's 8-12 weeks of steady business. I love the boer goat customers because they eat a LOT, and sheep seem to not be great moms because I always have a few sheep customers too. I have some dog breeders who buy off and on for big litters.

    One thing you have to remember is that you need to have milk when the customers need it. So- if you're selling for animals find out when people in your area have newborns. For humans, you need a supply year around or you will lose your customers to someone else when you don't have milk for 2-5 months. I milk at least one Lamancha- and sometimes a Nigerian- through the late summer/fall/winter to have milk year around. It's a PITB as far as going on vacation and milking in September in Florida (yuck!) but I have happy customers and milk in the fall when it seems to be in the most demand since everyone else is drying off their does to kid in January/Feb. I usually pick up some "early" pet customers at this time of year too.

    There is also a great market here for ADGA registered dairy does, and the Nigerian boys always sell well too since they are cute pets as wethers.

    All this has been done with pretty much zero advertising. Good customers refer others. Fellow breeders will refer people to you when they don't have milk/animals or they are too far and you have a good reputation. I'll put something up on a state wide homesteading page on FB sometimes, but that's it. If I have more milk this year I'm going to put up a flyer for milk/colostrum at the auction 1 mile away since that can probably get me some more pet customers.

    We also show and will make a few hundred dollars that way. With three kids showing we can show in the youth shows and pay less entry fees and get more premiums- so even if we don't have all first place for grand champion animals we do well at pay shows.
     
  6. Dec 14, 2016
    Finge

    Finge Chillin' with the herd

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    After some talking to my dad, again, we could also sell at a city near us, as he thinks they'd buy a lot more veggies and is usually full of dog breeders.
     
  7. Dec 14, 2016
    Southern by choice

    Southern by choice Herd Master

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    If you have 2160 sq ft that is roughly a 46.5 x 46.5 lot.
    The maximum ND you could have in such a small space is about 4.

    You will need to think where you will put a buck to breed the does.

    Not trying to be a downer here but Keeping does in milk cost $.
    On a small lot as you have mentioned they will not have enough forage so you are looking at alfalfa hay and dairy goat feed to keep your does in good health and to be able to produce milk.

    The amount of milk a Nigerian milks will vary. A higher end quality doe will milk when averaged out over 10 months approx. 2 lbs- 3lbs
    The amount of milk will also be determined by how many times she has given birth and how dedicated and skilled you are at milking.
    The goats will need to be milked 2x a day.
    This is a LONG term commitment.

    You will have vaccinations to give, kids will need to be disbudded and vaccinated as well as fed and cared for.

    Taking a class on parasites would be highly beneficial.
    One vet trip for a sick goat is costly.
    Understanding coccidia is important as well.

    I would be looking at the cost of maintaining goat health and keep. That is where your expense is.
    Many states that do allow sales of raw milk still may have state requirements for health testing of the does.

    At this point if you need a loan to purchase the goats than more than likely you will not be able to financially care for them.

    I encourage you to find a mentor /farm that will allow you to help out and you can learn. There is a steep learning curve with goats.
     
  8. Dec 23, 2016
    Fullhousefarm

    Fullhousefarm Loving the herd life

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    :thumbsup

    Finding a local goat far would be a win/win. You can learn more about goats, connect with others in the industry, and decide if it's really something you want to do- all while making someone very happy to have some help and maybe even *ghasp* be able to go on vacation if they have someone they trust trained to care for their animals.
     
  9. Dec 24, 2016
    Finge

    Finge Chillin' with the herd

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    so, after reviewing it, and speaking to my AG advisor on this, and the fact my parents got me 2 bucklings for Christmas, im going to probably show my two boys instead and see if goats are my thing that way, they will both be wethers, so that'll also be a bit easier to handle, or at least I think so.
     
    TAH and Latestarter like this.
  10. Dec 24, 2016
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

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    Sounds like a really good choice. Best of luck with your goats and showing!