1. BYH Official Poll: What are the things that you should consider before buying herds?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  2. Let's start this week fun. Submit your Horse Humor - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Dismiss Notice
  4. BYH Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)
    Dismiss Notice

Purple Dead-Nettle

Discussion in 'Natural and Organic Husbandry' started by Pastor Dave, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. Apr 25, 2017
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    1,630
    Likes Received:
    2,753
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Location:
    Hall, IN
    I am seeing this all over the ground here, and after a little research, found out it is edible, nutritious, and has good health qualities. It is of the mint family, but doesn't taste minty.
    Is it good for forage animals?

    More importantly to me, is it safe for domestic rabbits?
    @Bunnylady, @samssimonsays, @Bossroo, @CntryBoy777, @Baymule

    Thanks, Dave
     
  2. Apr 25, 2017
    CntryBoy777

    CntryBoy777 Herd Master

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2016
    Messages:
    6,846
    Likes Received:
    13,125
    Trophy Points:
    513
    Location:
    Wstrn Cent Florida
    Had to look that name up as I'm unfamiliar with it under that name, however "Henbit" is certainly recognized and known. I have no idea about rabbits, but my chickens, ducks, and goats don't eat it. I don't know "Why", but they don't. I don't believe it is toxic, but probably doesn't taste good to them. It grows here during the cooler seasons, but dies off with warmer temps. Ya will be wasting $$ trying to spray to get rid of it. It will just return. It has its own cycle, then dies out. I've never know of anything dying from it, but they just won't eat it.
     
  3. Apr 25, 2017
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    1,630
    Likes Received:
    2,753
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Location:
    Hall, IN
    Good to know. What I Googled gave human health effects, and there were definitely a few.
    I just thought with all that's out there I may as well try it out on the rabbits if it's safe and palatable for them.
    It is here while it's cooler too. It seems to be gone by hay baling season and back in the Fall. I generally haven't sprayed that field too much because it would kill off my red clover. So, not sure of a lot of weed control. Surprisingly, I read something abt sprinkling corn meal around vegetables in gardens for weed control!
     
  4. Apr 25, 2017
    Bunnylady

    Bunnylady True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,074
    Likes Received:
    1,943
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Location:
    Wilmington, NC
    Lamium (yeah, I'm a science nerd) is one of what some local farmers refer to as "tillable" weeds - "winter annuals" to the rest of us gardeners. They can tolerate a certain amount of cold, so grow during a time when there is little competition. They bloom and go to seed at the time when Springtime warmth starts the warm-season weeds growing. This is why they are "tillable" to the farmers - they can be turned under as the fields are being prepared for planting, and since they are dying down anyway, they won't be an issue for the crop plants.

    Frankly, I don't know why a common name is Henbit; even my goats pretty much avoid eating it. Chickweed, now - they love that!

    I have heard about corn gluten meal for weed control, but the one time we tried it in the greenhouse, it didn't work. Apparently, it didn't work for the folks in Oregon, either:

    http://extension.oregonstate.edu/ga...l-did-not-prevent-weeds-germinating-osu-study
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.
  5. Apr 25, 2017
    Bossroo

    Bossroo True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2010
    Messages:
    1,416
    Likes Received:
    631
    Trophy Points:
    221
    Frankly, I haven't seen this plant much less feed it on our ranch , so I really can't comment on it as a rabbit feed. I raised rabbits commercially , so I fed them alfalfa rabbit pellets for efficient rapid growth. Besides, harvesting then feeding rabbits from fields is labor intensive and there is a risk of bringing in pathogens ,etc, could be devistating .
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.
  6. Apr 25, 2017
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    1,630
    Likes Received:
    2,753
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Location:
    Hall, IN
    Thanks everyone, I appreciate it.
    My rabbits get alfalfa pellets in the morning, and grass hay at night. I give them treats occasionally consisting of dandelion leaves and clover. The breeders get these and my does right after breeding or after kindling. My grow-outs do not.

    If the purple dead nettle are palatable, they are really high in Vit C, and supposed to be good for respiratory allergies. For humans it acts as an astringent and helps minor cuts and burns. I have read folks eat it as a salad and steep for tea. I have so much right now, it would be nice to get these bunnies to eat it.
     
  7. Apr 25, 2017
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    13,526
    Likes Received:
    28,674
    Trophy Points:
    763
    Location:
    Northeast Texas
    I know it as henbit and nothing I have eats it, so I wouldn't give it to rabbits. It is a cool weather plant and dies back in the heat. Why don't you sow winter rye, it is a cool weather plant also and would go well with your clover.
     
    Pastor Dave likes this.
  8. Apr 25, 2017
    babsbag

    babsbag Herd Master

    Joined:
    May 10, 2010
    Messages:
    7,791
    Likes Received:
    8,930
    Trophy Points:
    563
    Location:
    Anderson, CA
    That miserable plant grows in my garden beds and when I pull it without gloves I invariable regret it. Stinging nettle is more like it so I find it interesting that it has medicinal properties. I have never seen it where my goats live so no idea if they would eat it or not. However it is an important bee plant so I leave it when I can.
     
  9. Apr 26, 2017
    Pastor Dave

    Pastor Dave True BYH Addict

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2015
    Messages:
    1,630
    Likes Received:
    2,753
    Trophy Points:
    293
    Location:
    Hall, IN
    I definitely have pulled (without gloves) stinging nettle, and instantly regretted it! The only way I would get stung with it now, is if I didn't have gloves on and grabbed one not seeing it. Believe it or not, the stinging nettle had some type of medicinal properties if you knew how to handle them.

    The way I see it, we have forgotten or never learned the things our parents' parents knew abt plants and herbs. God introduced these for mankind's good to use for our various needs. Not trying to get preachy. o_O
     
  10. Apr 26, 2017
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2011
    Messages:
    5,853
    Likes Received:
    10,223
    Trophy Points:
    553
    Location:
    East Texas
    Purple deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) and henbit (Lamium amplexicaule) are 2 different plants. There is a 3rd plant that looks very similar and grows during the same time frame as henbit and purple nettle. It is ground ivy (Glechoma hederacea) also called Creeping Charlie.

    All 3 plants look very much alike and often grow mixed in with each other.
    Lots of things are 'edible' and even 'nutritious' . Key word tho, is palatable. (I don't consider Brussels sprouts to be palatable no matter what the nutritionists and dietitians say)

    If it doesn't taste or smell good to an animal, it is simply not palatable and they won't eat it unless there is nothing else available or provided.

    Pictures of all 3 here
     
    Latestarter, Baymule and casportpony like this.