Question about de-wormers.

Vicky

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I have four Shetland Sheep. After doing a fecal exam at the vet, I found they have hook worms. I have Panacur from the vet but I am not sure how to administer it. I thought I heard it had to be given in a drench form (syringed into the back of the tongue) and not added to their feed. Wondering if anyone has any advice? Thanks in advance.
 

purplequeenvt

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Just squirt it in the mouth. If you add it to the grain, you risk someone not getting the correct dose.

How much did the vet say to give to each sheep? Panacur/Safeguard/fenbendazole has been overused in a lot of areas and has lost some of its efficacy and generally needs to be given at 3-4x the usual dose in order to be effective.
 

Vicky

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Thank you for your response. Unfortunately we don't have a vet in our area who works with sheep - so the fecal was done at a cat/dog vet. They put pre-measured doses in bags based on their weight (so I am not sure the amount in each) and instructions were to add to feed and feed separately.... but I thought I read that it should by-pass their mouths to be most effective? I can check with the vet to see and likely will have to another fecal to make sure it worked, and then give the larger dose as you've recommended. I'm new at hobby farming so this all is a learning curve! Thanks again.
 

purplequeenvt

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Did they give you pills or liquid? If you got pills, you can put each one’s dose in their grain, but you’ll need to feed them separately and make sure that they actually eat the pills. Or you can shove the pills into the back of the mouth so they swallow them. Watch your fingers though as those molars are sharp!

I would highly recommend figuring out what dosage the vet gave you because under-dosing is one of the reasons dewormers are losing efficacy.

You can easily find safeguard drench (labeled for cows or goats) at your local feed store.
 

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You can buy this in tubes at the feed store. It's almost impossible to overdose....except if you have a couple to each at one time. 😁 I've had the stopper fail and whole tubed a goat on occasion. No issues.
 

Vicky

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Did they give you pills or liquid? If you got pills, you can put each one’s dose in their grain, but you’ll need to feed them separately and make sure that they actually eat the pills. Or you can shove the pills into the back of the mouth so they swallow them. Watch your fingers though as those molars are sharp!

I would highly recommend figuring out what dosage the vet gave you because under-dosing is one of the reasons dewormers are losing efficacy.

You can easily find safeguard drench (labeled for cows or goats) at your local feed store.
It was actually in a powder form. I just ordered a syringe for drenching so hopefully that will help get it back in their throat. (I can't even imagine getting these sheep still enough to do this!! Will definitely need an extra set of arms!) I will call the vet on Monday to check on the dosage. I don't want to under dose- and I really a guessing on their weight by looking up average weights for this kind of sheep. I intended on buying the drench at our store but when the vet called with the results, they told me they had already gotten it ready so I went that route (but probably could have saved some money if I told them I'd pick it up myself!)
 

Vicky

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You can buy this in tubes at the feed store. It's almost impossible to overdose....except if you have a couple to each at one time. 😁 I've had the stopper fail and whole tubed a goat on occasion. No issues.
Thanks! I probably should have gone that route... and will pick some up to have on hand in case I don't have the correct amount now.
 

purplequeenvt

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Honestly, I wouldn’t even bother with what the vet gave you.

Don’t get the horse paste. While it is hard to overdose with fenbendazole, it is also very hard to get the right dose using the paste.

Get the drench. You can get a small bottle that is labeled for goats.

How old are your sheep? Gender? The average weight of an adult Shetland ewe is about 80lbs.

Did the vet give you a fecal count or just say that they had worms? They may not even need to be wormed. Was the fecal done just for the heck of it or were the sheep showing symptoms?
 

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My sheep are about 4 years old (we got them from someone who could no longer keep them). They seem smaller than 80 pounds (at least after they've been sheared!) ;-) I had read that when sheep share pasture with donkeys and horses, they should be checked for worms so that's why I thought I should. We haven't given any wormer since getting them 3 years ago. I will check with the vet on the fecal count (I still feel like a newbie with all of this!) - they just said they found hook worms. Thank you for your advice. I'll pick up the drench tomorrow.
 

purplequeenvt

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Honestly, unless they seem like they are being affected by the worms, I’d leave them be. If they are all in good condition and are eating and pooping normally, they should be fine.

Worming too frequently/on a schedule and under-dosing are 2 of the main causes of parasite resistance.
 
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