Question on using electric blankets for baby poultry; chicks, ducklings, etc

Nao57

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So about 3 months ago I was raising some ducklings and my heat lamp exploded.

I was shocked by this. I was right next to it when it happened, and glass everywhere. There was also a small fiery pop at first also.

(Is someone sabotaging these at the plants they are made? In theory, you could make them explode by putting small amounts of gas or flammable liquid in the bulbs...and it doesn't make sense why they'd explode. But that's a different topic...)

This has made me look at electric blankets as being cheaper and usable for brooders. And I'd heard you can do this. The plastic brooders are way overprice everywhere I see them at anyway, being at least 2 to 5 times the cost of an electric blanket.

So I wanted to ask how you would set up an electric blanket for a brooder of chicks, or ducklings?

(Note, there are places that sell waterproof electric blankets.)

But what do you do with the blanket for the setup? Do you put something over it to absorb moisture, mess, poop, etc? This is the part I'm most concerned over. And it does seem like you'd keep the water away from the blanket a space. What do you think about this part?

Thank you very much.

+edited in later; if there's any particular models that can't work with this, you could say so. I'm hoping a budget version low cost will work.
 

Beekissed

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A better option is a heating pad brooder. Here's a thread on it on BYC that explains how to put one together and use it: https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...d-in-the-brooder-picture-heavy-update.956958/

I was one of the earlier users of the heating pad for a brooder. After using a heating pad to hatch chicks it seemed the logical choice, so I did a search on YT about it and sure enough there was a lady who was using just such a thing. After posting about it on BYC, it sort of snowballed from there and many people use them now.

After using the heating pads, I'd never go back to using lamps...the chicks just do so much better in all ways.

Heat lamps are always a bit dicey as they do explode and/or they also gas off toxic fumes when using new bulbs and many have killed whole coops of chickens using them in the winter, either by the fumes or burning down the coop.
 

Finnie

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A better option is a heating pad brooder. Here's a thread on it on BYC that explains how to put one together and use it: https://www.backyardchickens.com/th...d-in-the-brooder-picture-heavy-update.956958/

I was one of the earlier users of the heating pad for a brooder. After using a heating pad to hatch chicks it seemed the logical choice, so I did a search on YT about it and sure enough there was a lady who was using just such a thing. After posting about it on BYC, it sort of snowballed from there and many people use them now.

After using the heating pads, I'd never go back to using lamps...the chicks just do so much better in all ways.

Heat lamps are always a bit dicey as they do explode and/or they also gas off toxic fumes when using new bulbs and many have killed whole coops of chickens using them in the winter, either by the fumes or burning down the coop.
X2

The Mama Heating Pad is the way to go!
 

Stephine

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I have used the ceramic heating bulbs for reptiles in brooders, and they are as easy to set up as a regular lamp, but sturdier, and don’t give off any light to keep chicks up all night. Of course you have to secure your lamp properly to make sure it can’t fall. Make sure you get one without teflon coating, of course! I have also used the plastic plates that chicks go under to warm up, (the concept is just like the heating pad set up) but it took a bit of teaching them where to go for warmth, and it needed more frequent adjustments. I liked both.
 
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