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rachels.haven

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Those kids don’t jump out? They sure are cute!
@Ridgetop ive never known propane to freeze.
They will in a day or two. Then out they go, but by then they've had a chance to learn how a lambar works.

You know, now that you mention it and I stop to think about it, I think propane liquefies when it gets really cold-really cold I think is like -44.
 

farmerjan

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Propane can have some problems in the -35 range or colder... And that is long term cold, not just a few hours. It has been a long time since I have been up on that stuff... One of the reasons why LP gas (not natural gas that is supplied in a pipeline) was fairly reliable in the colder north... and why natural gas in a pipeline was even more reliable in the coldest areas...

Yes diesel, needs to have an anti-gel additive if it gets real cold for any length of time... Added to every tank in the vehicle unless the on-farm tank has it added to it... and then it still might need an additive. Years ago we would add kerosene to diesel... it is really like a refined diesel... I think it was added at something like 20% of the diesel fuel... I might be wrong, but I know that it kept the diesel from gelling in the cold temps in Conn when I was working on the dairy way back then....
In the old stone house I lived in for several years, the diesel tank was in the cellar under the house so there was not any gelling problems.... It stayed over 45-50 degrees down there... not "draft free" but still was under the house and set into the side of the hill enough that the general rule of thumb of 55 degree "ground temps" held pretty true...
In the hot Texas heat you are going to have to be more concerned with the algae that grows from the heating and cooling of the diesel that causes condensation in the on farm tanks... it will gum up and totally screw up the filters and ignition systems in diesel engines...
 

Baymule

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Algae in a diesel tank? I did not know that. I have a 500 gallon farm tank on a stand. It’s not in use, still at son’s house. Hope to get it moved in the next few months. I have a friend that does all kinds of work, from sand blasting trailers to reconditioning the water tanks for the community water companies. I’ll ask him about that. Every time we had it filled we put the additive in the tank and changed out the filter.
 

Bruce

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I wonder if propane does too.
Propane is fine at the temps where we all live.

Years ago we would add kerosene to diesel... it is really like a refined diesel... I think it was added at something like 20% of the diesel fuel... I might be wrong, but I know that it kept the diesel from gelling in the cold temps in Conn when I was working on the dairy way back then....
They add it to above ground fuel oil (basically cheap diesel) here. Makes it a lot more expensive because kerosene is anything but cheap.
 

Baymule

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Told DH we would have to add the diesel additive in the tractors in the fall and winter. Can probably get it at the Co-Op or TSC or any of the 4 farm and ranch stores in Yantis. Probably even at Lowes! LOL
You can get it at auto parts stores too. Basically, keep some on hand, if we have a week long freeze, pour it in the tank and fill up. Since we only get one two serious freezes a year, it not that big of a deal—until it is. LOL
 

rachels.haven

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Last night it rained sideways and today it's still spitting so LGD Bailey decided to fire herself as LGD and refuses to go back into the pasture after breakfast and is now hiding somewhere, probably under our cabin's wrap around porch. All this is rather than to use her dogloo or the smokehouse wood shelter. I guess at 7 or 8 she wants to take brief stints as a farmyard dog...not that you can tell she's there.

She's not allowed in the barn presently because she's food aggressive and she 10000000% considers birth fluids food worth fighting for so all the goats are locked up for kidding season so she does not eat anyone's rear end off. She has also always acted like she was severely beaten in the past for something involving a newborn. I'm going to guess based on her food intensity that she ate one or harmed a ewe in her previous sheep guarding life so no kidding barn for that old girl (once the kids act like kids she ignores them and isn't afraid anymore).

I'm all okay with this. It's amusing that my 130 lbs dog has disappeared within the cleared, fenced confines of my front yard. I'm going to try to get her back in tonight. The coyotes don't sound like dogs here. They sound like people, and last night they were right close up against the fence, hollering at the dogs, so Riker needs smarter than him level of backup.
 

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