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Raising a lonely chick

Discussion in 'Chickens' started by newgirl97, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. Aug 6, 2018
    Sheepshape

    Sheepshape True BYH Addict

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    It probably won't be a problem if he mates with his mother.....anyway, if you're worried about what the offspring might be like, don't keep her eggs for hatching; eat them! If there are another 19 hens to choose from, then hatch their eggs.

    I've currently got a beautiful Gold Brahma rooster who was hand reared and yet he is/was aggressive. This is strange for two reasons....hand reared birds are usually much friendlier, and secondly, Brahmas are usually not at all aggressive. I have to admit to kicking him a couple of times when he has attacked me from behind (I am a softy veggie who hates to hurt anything). He is learning, though. Last time he went for me, I kicked him and threw gravel at him, then my dog snapped at him and chased him off, and finally my old Naked Neck rooster came steaming over and sent him packing. Since then, he has become much more respectful.

    So....likely not to be aggressive, but needs to be shown who is boss if the tendency starts to show up. No real problem if he mates with his mother (By the way did you know hens can eject the sperm of roosters who they consider undesirable?), and caponisation (castration) is a nasty business in my opinion. i would think you can keep him.

    Good Luck.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2018 at 4:02 AM
  2. Aug 7, 2018
    oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Loving the herd life

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    Generally friendly roosters who are handled turn aggressive at sexual maturity. Not all, but many do unfortunately. That bold behavior becomes dominating behaviors. I personally never want friendly roosters. I prefer them to remain a respectable distance away, and I take a hands off approach. All my roosters are good roosters at maturity this way.
     
  3. Aug 8, 2018 at 12:29 PM
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I believe that is common. They see their caregiver as an equal, or worse, subservient. NOT something you want in a rooster.
     
    oldhenlikesdogs likes this.
  4. Aug 8, 2018 at 3:22 PM
    RustyBucketFarmGirl

    RustyBucketFarmGirl Chillin' with the herd

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    I would get another chick or 2. Being social animals i would like they would thrive better with more chickens.

    I am not a chicken expert but when i got my chickens and my goats this year i was encouraged to get more than one.

    Good luck!
     
  5. Aug 9, 2018 at 1:15 AM
    Sheepshape

    Sheepshape True BYH Addict

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    They probably do. A few lessons in "The Pecking Order" and your own position in it (i.e Head Roo) works for most.If I want to keep a rooster, but he has too much attitude, I go to the coop first thing in the morning and pluck him from the perch (always the highest perch!). I then tuck him in my armpit and hold him tightly there (gripping the feet helps, as may a cloth/towel over the lower part of his body)). I then walk around for about 10 minutes with him under my armpit..... making sure that all the flock members see him. Only do this if you are able to hold him this way......no point in getting yourself hurt.Repeat this over two or three mornings. You are Head Rooster.

    No doubt there are some terminally nasty roosters.....they make good chicken stew, I'm told (being veggie, my dog eats them).Some breeds are far meaner than others....huge Brahmas and Orpingtons are usually very docile.

    Having kept (many) chickens for over 20 years and having had 6 roosters simultaneously (all free-ranging together and peacefully), I can vouch for the above method.