Ram horns questions

KatahdinMomma

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Hey ya'll!

Be gentle with me. I don't know if it's my area, but I get chastised for not disbudding my sheep, though I don't have any sheep with horns, lol. I know and understand the risks involved, however we breed for butcher and choose not to disbud.

Anyhow, I have katahdin/dorper crosses. A ram was born last year that is destined for greatness on all accounts, other than not having been proven yet. We did not disbud him, though he's is almost a year with no sign of horns. I know this breed can be polled but this was not a question I asked upon purchasing my original breeding stock. So how long before I know whether or not he will have horns?

Also, any tips info on selling a breeding ram? If he has twin genes, from a proven mom/dad, is gorgeous on all accounts with massive testes (which I understand is an important feature?) what is a fair selling price? Or if he isn't proven is it not really as wise as I think to sell him?
 

purplequeenvt

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Sheep do not get disbudded. In fact, the majority of breeds are naturally polled.

**Some sheep, particularly rams can get small horns that are called scurs. They usually aren't we'll attach and will often break off**

If a sheep is going to have horns, you will know right off. I have Shetlands and I can tell whether a lamb is a ram or ewe when they are first born just be feeling the top of the head. They have very obvious bumps where their horns will be.

As for selling a ram, do some research on your area and figure out what the current market value is for a similar animal. We have some crossbred sheep , but the majority are purebred and registered.

Katahdins, Dorpers, and crosses between the 2 seem to be very popular right now.
 

KatahdinMomma

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Sheep do not get disbudded. In fact, the majority of breeds are naturally polled.

**Some sheep, particularly rams can get small horns that are called scurs. They usually aren't we'll attach and will often break off**

If a sheep is going to have horns, you will know right off. I have Shetlands and I can tell whether a lamb is a ram or ewe when they are first born just be feeling the top of the head. They have very obvious bumps where their horns will be.

As for selling a ram, do some research on your area and figure out what the current market value is for a similar animal. We have some crossbred sheep , but the majority are purebred and registered.

Katahdins, Dorpers, and crosses between the 2 seem to be very popular right now.
Thanks so much! That's a load off. I had been wondering, and this eases my nerves. Thanks for the response.
 
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