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Recommended reading-Birthing, Weaning, and Raising Young Goats

Discussion in 'Birthing, Weaning, and Raising Young Goats' started by Farmer Kitty, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. Mar 10, 2015
    Honest Omnivore

    Honest Omnivore Chillin' with the herd

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    Emergency Pulling technique- learned the hard* way, demonstrated by the vet. If you can't get the kid out, even with a good grip, here's the "last ditch" method a vet taught me when we had a crazy bad birth. Place the doe over a bale of hay, have a helper lay across her (only leaning a little weight on her if needed) to hold her in place. Pull down towards the ground as you pull the kid. This position allows gravity to help as the doe's weight, and a little of your helper's weight, add internal pressure to aid pushing the kid out.

    Sounds crazy -the vet said that it can help if the puller doesn't have enough strength, or if the kid is "wedged" like ours was.

    *The uterus was punctured, and intestine has snaked inside. Two kids were knotted together with the intestine. The vet's theory was that the contractions pushed a hoof through the uterus wall, causing the intestine to herniate into the uterus. He had never heard of it happening. None survived, it was my FIRST kidding experience. Thankfully we've had only positive experiences since then, and only one birth that required any assistance (mispositioned kid) which resolved with everyone happy and healthy.
     
  2. Mar 10, 2015
    mikiz

    mikiz Loving the herd life

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    Jeez :eek: that's one horrible way to learn any emergency technique! I'm sorry for your losses :hugs
     
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  3. Mar 16, 2015
    Jenn27

    Jenn27 Ridin' The Range

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    OMG.....that's scary!! We want to breed our goats, but I'm not sure I could handle that! :eek:
     
  4. Feb 28, 2016
    Jenn27

    Jenn27 Ridin' The Range

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    Thank you for this! Quick question. So my doe just gave birth yesterday and we didn't realize she was pregnant. So we have been deworming her every two weeks as usual. So is it safe to continue to deworm her as she is due today...or should I wait until she is finished nursing?
     
  5. Feb 28, 2016
    norseofcourse

    norseofcourse True BYH Addict Golden Herd Member

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    What are you using to deworm her with every two weeks?
     
  6. Feb 28, 2016
    Jenn27

    Jenn27 Ridin' The Range

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    Panacur. I spoke to my daughter's FFA /Ag teacher first.
     
  7. Feb 28, 2016
    norseofcourse

    norseofcourse True BYH Addict Golden Herd Member

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    Interesting - is this for a limited time, or every two weeks forever? When was the last time you had a fecal test done, and what did it show?

    Protocols for wormings have changed a lot in recent years, to help slow the rate at which worms become resistant. The teacher may have a very good reason for recommending that worming schedule, however, and I would be interested in her reasoning if you could share it, please. I'm always up for learning about something I wasn't aware of.
     
  8. Feb 28, 2016
    Latestarter

    Latestarter Novice; "Practicing" Animal Husbandry Moderator

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    That's a LOT of deworming! Before you do any more, I might suggest you have a fecal done to see if it's even needed. Typically, they shouldn't need worming more than every 6 months or more... and even then, a fecal should be done first to determine what if any worm load there is, and what dewormer would be best to use against that specific parasite load. Typically different dewormers are used in succession to help prevent the/any surviving worms/eggs from building up a tolerance to the dewormer being used.
     
  9. Feb 28, 2016
    Jenn27

    Jenn27 Ridin' The Range

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    Well she was telling me that it helps kill the cycle. But she did tell me today it eas best to hold off on the deworming until Missy is done nursing.