Rescue donkey hates her feet being trimmed

Rhonda777

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I'm brand new to the forum and have a question. We rescued a donkey named Buttercup a few years ago, we have horses so she just hangs out with them. I don't know how old she is but she's gotta be at least 20. Her previous owners were neglectful and she foundered probably numerous times, she has the real thick neck that shows when foundering has occurred. She is super sweet with a great personality, but when it comes to getting her feet trimmed, it's all out war. She will fight violently to the point that she is dangerous! We have tried different things in order to get it done, 5 grown men held her down, other times we sedated her but even she still fought and the vet said that it would be dangerous to give her any more as it could kill her, the last time we ran her through a squeeze shoot and that worked fairly well but I know that now that she knows what's going to happen she will not go into it again. She also was never taught to walk with a handler so that also makes it hard. Anyway, I need some advice as we're running out of options and she HAS to get her feet trimmed, they grow so fast.
Does anyone have any advice, I desperate! Thanks.
 

Alibo

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This is long and you may have already tried but....

You might have to go back to basics. After one last forceful trim, treat her like a new addition.

I would set her up in a round pen or something similar that you can easily escape from. Everyday she gets her legs rubbed with a lounge whip/long stick gently. For every touch accepted there is a tiny treat. This may end up being a two person job and take a lot of time but I have done two semi ferals this way with success. When you are confident enough to touch her feet with your own hands give a bigger treat and continue (do not pick up yet). If she resists or acts nervous go back to the last stage. She will realize that with greater trust comes bigger treats. It took me six months to be able to trim a donkey that had never been touched. But everyday I did 3 five minute sessions. Sometimes it felt futile :he but now she can stand for the farrier with the best of the horses!

I Never tied them up for this. The ability to escape from something scary and desire to participate is important for trust. The segregating in a round pen will help with this because she will crave interaction and stimulation. I am Not saying to lock her up All the time for six months, maybe 4 to 5 hours a day. She sees you bring food, water and treats to her and keep it Only positive.

Six months is a very long time to go without a trim but if you already have most of her trust this may be a lot shorter and pay off in the long run

I do not usually recommend treating donkeys but this is important training. I used a clicker and they catch on to that quicker than a dog.

Good luck, and peace and patience!

:fl:hugs

I hope other equine savvy people might have some additions to this plan too

If all else fails you might have to resort to a shoe stock:(
 

Alaskan

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This is long and you may have already tried but....

You might have to go back to basics. After one last forceful trim, treat her like a new addition.

I would set her up in a round pen or something similar that you can easily escape from. Everyday she gets her legs rubbed with a lounge whip/long stick gently. For every touch accepted there is a tiny treat. This may end up being a two person job and take a lot of time but I have done two semi ferals this way with success. When you are confident enough to touch her feet with your own hands give a bigger treat and continue (do not pick up yet). If she resists or acts nervous go back to the last stage. She will realize that with greater trust comes bigger treats. It took me six months to be able to trim a donkey that had never been touched. But everyday I did 3 five minute sessions. Sometimes it felt futile :he but now she can stand for the farrier with the best of the horses!

I Never tied them up for this. The ability to escape from something scary and desire to participate is important for trust. The segregating in a round pen will help with this because she will crave interaction and stimulation. I am Not saying to lock her up All the time for six months, maybe 4 to 5 hours a day. She sees you bring food, water and treats to her and keep it Only positive.

Six months is a very long time to go without a trim but if you already have most of her trust this may be a lot shorter and pay off in the long run

I do not usually recommend treating donkeys but this is important training. I used a clicker and they catch on to that quicker than a dog.

Good luck, and peace and patience!

:fl:hugs

I hope other equine savvy people might have some additions to this plan too

If all else fails you might have to resort to a shoe stock:(
I agree. Very good advice.

We had a horse that we had trouble with... and that is mostly what we did. We didn't have to start with a stick or anything ... he was tame enough that we could touch his legs.

Anyway, LOTS of basic ground training for the horse.

We also got a different ferrier, one that wasn't scared of the horse. NIGHT and day difference.

Good ground training for the humans... proper posture and that sort of thing, also makes a world of difference. If you walk wrong, they know it and freak.
 

Baymule

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What @Alibo said. X2

I had an abused jack donkey. It took two years to finally trim his feet without a fight. I would enter his pen with a halter and rope and he would run from me. But when he saw the farrier, he would stop, let me halter him up, and he stood to have his feet trimmed. He finally figured out that if he just stood there, it was over faster. But the 2 years inbetween were between a rodeo and trying to rope a rocket ship.

For the squeeze chute, pen her up with it and set her water bucket just inside it. If you have room, set her feed beside it. If she refuses to approach the chute, don't panic. She WILL get thirsty and hungry enough to stick her head in it. After several days, move it a little further in. Finally, put her feed and water so that she has to walk through the chute to get to it. It might help for that last hoof trim before you do what Alibo said.
 

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