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Senile Texas Aggie - comic relief for the rest of you

Discussion in 'Member's "BackYardHerds" Journals' started by Senile_Texas_Aggie, Jul 11, 2018.

  1. Jun 8, 2019
    Mike CHS

    Mike CHS Herd Master Golden Herd Member

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    I'm a novice at that kind of thing so my input is useless but I don't like turning over the soil. I had a lot of low areas but I filled them in rather than try to change the area itself.
     
  2. Jun 8, 2019
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

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    Tho a few do, most sub-soilers don't actually 'turn' the soil. They work sorta like an aerator does, except for moisture and cut deeper. They are just a straight or forward curving shank that goes into the ground and opens up a small trench, and the soil mostly falls back into the cut trench. Like a chisel plow if you ever saw one of those. Some do have a flat shoe on the bottom, most don't. The whole purpose is just to loosen compacted soil so water can move.
    The shanks look very much like the scarifiers on a box blade.
    I built my own using the 3 pt framework of an old middle buster/meadow buster, but gave it away a few months ago. They work well if you can get deep enough to reach a strata that will accept moisture and divert it horizontally away from a wet area, but all my moist surface areas are even wetter farther down.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  3. Jun 9, 2019 at 12:07 PM
    Senile_Texas_Aggie

    Senile_Texas_Aggie True BYH Addict

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    I am not sure how moist the soil is deeper down, or if the soil's composition would change to something that would accept the moisture. I have considered buying a post hole digger and simply digging holes in the pasture so that the water would have a place to sink into the ground, but I don't know if that would work. Plus, I am not sure if I want post holes in the middle of my pasture. I have no current plans to put in fencing that requires post holes, so the post hole digger would not be used.

    I seem to recall both of you talking about drain tile before. IIRC, it had to do with farms in Iowa and how they have a lot of drain tile. What in the world would that be? When I think of drain tile, I think of maybe tile that lines the bottom of a small ditch to permit water flow, reduce vegetation, and prevent erosion. Is that what that is?

    Senile Texas Aggie
     
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  4. Jun 9, 2019 at 12:26 PM
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master

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    I think originally it was pipe made of clay so "tile". Possibly also a trench with flat clay tiles on the bottom (like a "French drain" around a foundation). Now it has nothing to do with tile but is plastic pipe, usually corrugated, with holes in it. It can also be made with PVC pipe though not in a farm setting, too expensive. The idea is that the water goes into the pipe and then runs downhill to somewhere it can exit. The pipe has to be covered with something to keep the soil from getting into the pipe and clogging it.

    In smaller settings, like the curtain drain that was put in front of my barn, the pipe is covered with some sort of fabric then stone is layered over it so the rain coming off the roof can be channeled away from the barn, in my case down to the pond behind the barn.
     
  5. Jun 11, 2019 at 4:06 PM
    Senile_Texas_Aggie

    Senile_Texas_Aggie True BYH Addict

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    If posts had titles, then this one would have the title "Frustrating Tool Day". We went to work out along the drainage ditch that we have been clearing. I was eager to use the brush blade, as I had gone to the hardware store and bought some machine screws (all but one were for spares) to put in the aluminum housing of the brush blade to hold it stationary to the inner shaft that contains the rotating square shaft from the power head. Before we headed out, I put one of the machine screws in and tried to tighten it down. I noticed that the threads had been worn out and the screw would not tighten down. I hoped that it would work anyhow. But upon starting the power head and revving it up, I saw the screw start vibrating out a bit. When I tried cutting down my first tree, the vibration made the screw come out and the head rotate freely about the shaft. Rats!

    Then I switched to the pole saw for the power head. I had not used it for quite a while and wondered if it still worked. When I attached it to the power head, and revved up the power, the chain worked fine. "Great!" I thought. But about the third tree I cut down with it, the chain came off. I put it back and cut down another tree. The chain came off again. There was no more adjustment available for the bar. I guess once the chain got warm, it lengthened and then would not stay on the bar.

    So I got out the chainsaw. I really like the chainsaw, except that when I bend or squat down, I get short of breath (big fat belly does that) and so I fatigue easily. But this was worse -- I cut down one tree and then the chain came off. I noticed that there was not more adjustment available to lengthen the bar, just like the gas pole saw. So that left us with two tools that still worked: the battery powered pole saw (my Beautiful Gal's favorite tool) and the reciprocating saw. I used the reciprocating saw, which requires me to bend or squat down (just like the chainsaw) but takes a good bit longer to cut down a tree. So I became quite fatigued by all of the squatting and bending. But we worked until all of our batteries had run down, which happened around 1 PM or so, then we quit for the day.

    I will post before and after pictures once we finally finish clearing the ditch, which may be by the end of the week.

    Senile Texas Aggie
     
  6. Jun 11, 2019 at 4:52 PM
    Bruce

    Bruce Herd Master

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    OK, there has to be something going on with those chains. I put quite a few hours on my MS180 and never came close to having the chain "stretch" to the point it wouldn't stay on. I guess you could buy a new chain, never hurts to have a spare, and see if you still have the problem.

    Gorilla tape! Just one wrap around the shaft covering the screw and it won't vibrate out. Sounds like you need to retap the hole and get the proper size screw for that tap.

    Not the fastest way but I've been known to use my knees. I can't "catcher squat", never could. 1 minute of that and I can hardly stand up and walking take awhile.
     
  7. Jun 11, 2019 at 9:04 PM
    Baymule

    Baymule Herd Master

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    I keep 2 new chains at all times, plus a new bar and chain. Screw up one, get another. A neighbor has a sharpener, so it all works out.
     
  8. Jun 11, 2019 at 10:36 PM
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

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    Troy shuldn't never Bilt a dam thing.......

    Should be able to get a replacement gearbox at a repair shop that handles MTD products. New or used.
    Or get it on line. They run about $30+/-

    You will need the model number. Probably get it from Amazon.
    An example:
    http://www.thepartsbiz.com/Troy-Bil...Cutting-Head-for-TB575EC-TB575SS_p_34124.html

    Might try here:
    https://www.ebay.com/b/Troy-Bilt-String-Trimmer-Gearboxes/71278/bn_7773497
    If the trimmer was mine tho, I would determine what size and thread pitch set screw that was originally in the head, then get the next largest size, drill and tap accordingly.


    I sharpen my chains, and it takes about 10-12 minutes each.

    It is absolutely imperative, that you keep the chain and bar out of the dirt and sand. Dirt will kill the lube action along the bar and in the pins of the chain links and chain stretch will multiply.
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2019 at 10:44 PM
  9. Jun 12, 2019 at 8:02 AM
    Senile_Texas_Aggie

    Senile_Texas_Aggie True BYH Addict

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    Thanks, everyone. Does anyone know where I can get the chainsaw repair tools where I can remove a link from the chain and put it back together, the way the guy in the YouTube video the Mr. @greybeard posted did? I just searched online and saw some tools mentioned but nothing that was obvious.

    Regarding the brush blade, I will try to tap the hole for a slightly larger screw, and then use tape to keep it from vibrating out. I will let everyone know how it turns out. Thanks again for everyone's comments.
     
  10. Jun 12, 2019 at 11:00 AM
    greybeard

    greybeard Herd Master

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    Any chainsaw dealer or shop that repairs chain saws should have those chain link tools. I got mine at the local Stihl dealer.

    Not tape..Locktite® Threadlock Blue or Purple on the set screw.
    I use it on lots of different things.
    Make sure you get the right one..using the Red means you will have to heat it to ever get the screw back out. :
    http://henkeladhesivesna.com/blog/the-difference-between-red-blue-green-and-purple-threadlockers/

    I've used them all and for small screws, Purple seems to work best.
    http://henkeladhesivesna.com/blog/when-and-why-to-use-purple-threadlocker/

    You can find any of them at any auto parts store, such as Autozone or NAPA