Senile Texas Aggie - comic relief for the rest of you

Bruce

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This part looks positive:
"Last year G.E. Renewable Energy, a division of General Electric, announced that it would begin recycling the blades by shredding them into raw material for use in cement manufacturing. In the Netherlands, one city turned the old blades into a playground. Cork, Ireland, is experimenting with using retired blades to construct bridges."

Water is back on, hopefully the fix lasts this time. Hubby installed a pressure regulator that brings it from about 160 pressure down to 50.
That should fix your leak problems :D You don't really need or want 160 PSI anyway.

BUT you can find a small farmer or custom grower such as myself and buy half a steer, a hog or chicken slaughtered and packaged to your specifications for the freezer.
Good plan Bay. I buy my ground beef from a farming couple (in their 70's) and my non ground beef from another farm that does beef and veggies. They were a dairy farm for about the last 40 years. Both raise their animals humanely and in small quantities. I met these people at the farmer's market. Typically in the "off season" I'll go to their farms and buy a bunch of meat for my small freezer. Rib eyes tonight from Windfall Veggies and Beef and I'm NOT going to "chicken fry" them!! ;) Green beans from Bergeron's, mashed potatoes from the grocery store :( Too early in the year for local potatoes. In the fall I get a 50# bag from the ground beef farmers.

The non homogenized milk I drink comes from the family owned grocery store but gets delivered a couple of times a week by the "milk maid" ;) Her farm is all of 3 cows 2 towns over. They are doing well, only had 2 cows last year :D
 

Baymule

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Yes @Bruce you can opt out of the industrial food. I’m glad you have found small farmers to buy from. My customers want to know how the meat they eat was raised and treated. They can come to the farm any time and see for themselves. They tell me that the meat I raise is better than anything they can buy at the store. I must be doing something right.

There are no hog sewage lagoons on my property. There are no dried manure dust storms, nor deep manure mud. I am careful with my tiny ecosystem. I have several types of dung beetles that break up the manure, eat it, bury it and lay their eggs in it. I’m proud of those dung beetles, they do their lowly job and the environment benefits from them. My Pig Palace with 3 big hogs doesn’t even have a smell.
 
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