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Separating boar/gilt before breeding?

Discussion in 'Breeds & Breeding - Pigs' started by dukeis84, Feb 8, 2017.

  1. Feb 8, 2017
    dukeis84

    dukeis84 Just born

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    I have a breeding pair of Kune Kune's about 20 months old. They have grown up together in the same pen but have never bred. If I want them to breed should I separate them for a while? Or is one of them maybe not viable? The boar noses the gilt around but I've never actually witnessed him top her. She tends to never be willing, always fighting back. What's going on?
     
  2. Feb 8, 2017
    farmerjan

    farmerjan Loving the herd life

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    Try separating them for starters. That might get her in the "mood" to come in heat. I don't know that breed in particular, but most any hog should be coming into heat and breeding before that age.
    It doesn't happen often, but once in awhile you find a gilt that does not come into heat or breed. Kinda like the male/female twins the female is usually no good in cattle. It usually doesn't happen in any other breed of animal, look at all the pigs and lambs and kids and everything, but we had a couple that didn't breed one time and the vet said they will see it occasionally. Since so many are just raised up for meat, who knows how often it does happen.
    I would try the separate pens, watch to see if she shows any heat signs then put the boar in with her. If they are healthy and all, I am not sure if there is any other way to tell; maybe a shot from the vet to get her to cycling....I am not sure if they use lutalyse in hogs or not, I know we used oxytocin when we had a sow that wouldn't let her milk down very well.
    One thing though, if she is a problem to get bred, you might want to consider getting another female. You don't need to perpetuate a problem or keep one that will not reproduce easily. There are enough other things that can happen, like problems farrowing and laying on the pigs, to not be dealing with one that will not at least get bred easily.
     
    dukeis84 likes this.
  3. Jul 26, 2017
    Farmer Connie

    Farmer Connie Loving the herd life

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    She should go into heat every 21 days. I always have my boars segregated from my women. Selective breeding and control over their reproductive cycles. When a boar has been separate from gilts or sows, he will fill that need to attempt to mate. But the gilt or sow has to be fully submissive.
    Having control of mating gives you an accuracy of due date as well. Rule of thumb is 3 months, 3 weeks, 3 days. If you are able to witness the mating, you're prepared for birth date.
    Separate your pigs for awhile. If she shows signs of being in heat, mark a calendar and keep track of her cycles.
    Good luck!