Setting up my first rabbitry. Hi! Couple questions.

Tre3hugger

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Finally got my cages hung and squared away. They have actually been hung, but the chickens have been finding new and creative ways to access the top! Oh well, this is why I set them up early. Getting the kinks out. I had to better block off the loft and fill in all the spaces with feed bags. Also used feed bags along the wall as a urine guard. Next step, get a couple plastic roofing panels to direct waste away from chickens heads toward a collection bin. Will post pics in a bit, internet is draggin!
 

Tre3hugger

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Niele da Kine

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If you have purebred stock, you can sell off rabbits as breeding stock. Folks will pay more for purebred than meat mutts, usually.

I keep pedigreed English angoras for their wool but sell rabbits as well. A pedigreed rabbit is easy, you just keep track of their relatives and have it all written down. You don't have to send in anything anywhere or pay anything to get them pedigreed, although if you want them registered then I think they have to be pedigreed and inspected by an ARBA rabbit judge.

In any case, keeping records is a good thing and the program that I've found to be the most useful is Kintracks. It's supposed to be a pedigree program, but it keeps track of just about anything that you want to track. It's also really handy to keep track of who was bred to whom and when they're due. Kintracks is a free download and you can load in the first several hundred animals without needing to pay for the full access key. But, even when you do need to pay for the program, it's only $20 Australian which is less in U.S. dollars.

If you can get a 'proven' doe to start with, that may be good. Breed them within their first year so they will conceive easier. It might be nice to get four does and two bucks so you'll be able to keep them from being totally inbred.
 

HornyToadAcres

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If you have purebred stock, you can sell off rabbits as breeding stock. Folks will pay more for purebred than meat mutts, usually.

I keep pedigreed English angoras for their wool but sell rabbits as well. A pedigreed rabbit is easy, you just keep track of their relatives and have it all written down. You don't have to send in anything anywhere or pay anything to get them pedigreed, although if you want them registered then I think they have to be pedigreed and inspected by an ARBA rabbit judge.

In any case, keeping records is a good thing and the program that I've found to be the most useful is Kintracks. It's supposed to be a pedigree program, but it keeps track of just about anything that you want to track. It's also really handy to keep track of who was bred to whom and when they're due. Kintracks is a free download and you can load in the first several hundred animals without needing to pay for the full access key. But, even when you do need to pay for the program, it's only $20 Australian which is less in U.S. dollars.

If you can get a 'proven' doe to start with, that may be good. Breed them within their first year so they will conceive easier. It might be nice to get four does and two bucks so you'll be able to keep them from being totally inbred.
Do you spin the wool yourself or sell it?
 

Tre3hugger

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If you have purebred stock, you can sell off rabbits as breeding stock. Folks will pay more for purebred than meat mutts, usually.

I keep pedigreed English angoras for their wool but sell rabbits as well. A pedigreed rabbit is easy, you just keep track of their relatives and have it all written down. You don't have to send in anything anywhere or pay anything to get them pedigreed, although if you want them registered then I think they have to be pedigreed and inspected by an ARBA rabbit judge.

In any case, keeping records is a good thing and the program that I've found to be the most useful is Kintracks. It's supposed to be a pedigree program, but it keeps track of just about anything that you want to track. It's also really handy to keep track of who was bred to whom and when they're due. Kintracks is a free download and you can load in the first several hundred animals without needing to pay for the full access key. But, even when you do need to pay for the program, it's only $20 Australian which is less in U.S. dollars.

If you can get a 'proven' doe to start with, that may be good. Breed them within their first year so they will conceive easier. It might be nice to get four does and two bucks so you'll be able to keep them from being totally inbred.
Appreciate the input! I will definitely try to get unrelated breeders. Maybe at least one pair of purebreds. I was discussing this with my partner last night. Seems like rabbits are gaining in popularity near me and there is no regulations for selling them live. Why not breed some to sell?
 

Grizzlyhackle

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@Tre3hugger . Ticks and mosquitos also bother rabbits. Watch around their ears for ticks. I don't know if they can get lyme disease but it's sure rough on dogs. For skeeter's Product called Spartan Mosquito eradicator thins them out pretty good. It's a hanging trap not a spray. I noticed it was better outside. Works about 90 days. Having chickens ( I don't like chickens) you know you'll have flies. Try to keep everything dry as possible and have pulverized lime on hand for the aroma. Wet rabbit droppings are bad enough add in chickens it can get real bad. Others have said it keep them off your rabbit cages. I'd make real sure that none of them can reach a rabbit thru the cage. Other than eating them I have nothing good to say about chickens.
I saw you mentioned quail, what type are you planning on?
 

Larsen Poultry Ranch

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Appreciate the input! I will definitely try to get unrelated breeders. Maybe at least one pair of purebreds. I was discussing this with my partner last night. Seems like rabbits are gaining in popularity near me and there is no regulations for selling them live. Why not breed some to sell?
Double check your state laws regarding selling rabbits, many states have a law prohibiting sales prior to 8 weeks old. This helps prevent issues as at 8 weeks a rabbit should be fully weaned to pellets/hay. Rabbits younger than that are typically still transitioning from milk to full time pellets/hay and are more delicate and possible to get sick/die.
 

Tre3hugger

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@Tre3hugger . Ticks and mosquitos also bother rabbits. Watch around their ears for ticks. I don't know if they can get lyme disease but it's sure rough on dogs. For skeeter's Product called Spartan Mosquito eradicator thins them out pretty good. It's a hanging trap not a spray. I noticed it was better outside. Works about 90 days. Having chickens ( I don't like chickens) you know you'll have flies. Try to keep everything dry as possible and have pulverized lime on hand for the aroma. Wet rabbit droppings are bad enough add in chickens it can get real bad. Others have said it keep them off your rabbit cages. I'd make real sure that none of them can reach a rabbit thru the cage. Other than eating them I have nothing good to say about chickens.
I saw you mentioned quail, what type are you planning on?
Thank you for your input! I'm not sure how they would get ticks suspended in a shed? Same about the mosquitoes But I will keep it in mind. I plan to hang some fly tape so may as well hang the mosquito stuff too.
In my neck of the woods, I will have flies in the spring/summer chickens or not! I do use pdz in the chicken coop and have adequate venting to promote dryness and respiratory health. I am adding power to the shed this spring so I can provide a ventilation fan in the hottest months.
The rabbit waste will be directed to a double tote system, separating urine and feces.The urine for the compost pile, the solids for direct garden application and extra for composting. Chicken and rabbit waste won't be mixing.
Not sure what your beef with chickens is lol, but to each their own. I agree they're delicious, especially my pasture raised Cornish X!
I am getting 25 coturnix quail, 23 female 2 male, from myshire farms genetics. My friend is hatching the eggs and raising them until they are sexable and off heat. I have quite the demand for pickled quail eggs by the case! They will be living in a lean to style aviary connected to the chicken.rabbit barn, but not sharing a yard.
Thanks again for sharing your insight!
 

Tre3hugger

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Double check your state laws regarding selling rabbits, many states have a law prohibiting sales prior to 8 weeks old. This helps prevent issues as at 8 weeks a rabbit should be fully weaned to pellets/hay. Rabbits younger than that are typically still transitioning from milk to full time pellets/hay and are more delicate and possible to get sick/die.
Just double checked. I am all clear in my state, although I would likely only sell weaned rabbits anyway. Thanks for the heads up!
 

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